{ 53 comments… read them below or add one }

Vote -1 Vote +1BlindSquirl
September 17, 2010 at 7:34 am

David,

Excellent post.

I like the fact that your info consistently pushes principles rather than the “buy-this-knife” or “every B.O.B. must contain a SIG P-226 with 82 rounds of 147 grain JHP…” type of data.

I’ve gotten a ton of valuable info from your Survive in Place course already and it’s only week 3. This is impressive considering the fact that over the last 5 or 6 years, my family and I have been forced to “survive-in-place”. Not through disasters, but through every day occurences, i.e. power out for 2 days after high winds, no running water for a week while the new well was drilled, etc.

Keep up the good work. I’m looking forward to next week’s lesson.

BlindSquirl

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Vote -1 Vote +1jeff loiselle
September 17, 2010 at 3:25 pm

i personally get a great deal of information from Dave Cantebury wilderness outfitters.com. for example his 5 C’s of survival.
1) cutting tool: pretty self explainatory
2) container: for cooking/boiling water or carrying water, etc.
3) combustion: any fire making tool
4) cordage: any kind of binding material wire/550 paracord/ etc.
5) cover : any kind of tarp/tentlike material that gets you out of the weather and prevents exposure.

these 5 areas will help you survive weather you are in the deep dark amazon or the cold of the arctic .

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Vote -1 Vote +1David Morris
September 17, 2010 at 4:27 pm

Yup…I’ve really gotten to like Dave. By the way, his site is wildernessoutfittersARCHERY.com.

David

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Vote -1 Vote +1jeff loiselle
October 16, 2010 at 3:09 am

i agree david… mr cantebury certainly does have superior survival and hunting skils. i very much agree with the idea never drop tools from a pack to loose weight. with tools you can make almost anything else you need. he is certainly a wealth of information. thanks again david

p.s. i knew about the archery forgot to put it in ……

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Vote -1 Vote +1David
September 17, 2010 at 8:35 am

David – Great newsletter and product. I am really feeling more confident that I can assist those I love in a disaster.

One area you didn’t touch on, or that I haven’t gotten to in your material, is pets. In a crisis/emergency, you should have a plan for your pets. Keep in mind that if it’s a GOOD situation and you have to move to a shelter, most shelters do not allow pets.

We adopted a 12 year old, front declawed cat. She’s old and totally an indoor cat. We adjusted our evacuation plans and supplies to account for taking her, as I could not stand to leave her behind. We also practice putting her in her carrier, which is prepped for deployment with bedding.

Keep up the great work.

Joel

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Vote -1 Vote +1Ruth C Roadinger
September 17, 2010 at 8:41 am

Excellent. Thank you for making me think! Also for the information and ideas. I
think women need to learn to use knives, slingshots, etc; I didn’t really know how to use a knife for defense until a year or so ago—most people do not! (99%?) Most
would use it in exactly the opposite position to what would really work. We need to know what to do, most of us have no idea! We also have no idea how to feed ourselves w/o a market at hand.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Mad Dawg
September 17, 2010 at 10:01 am

Great article this week, it’s always a pleasure to read & rethink my survival plans. My gear layout is a major concern although I can’t depend on it 24/7, like you stated if SHTF & I’m at work or if I’m going with a friend or relative somewhere in their vehicle & they don’t keep survival gear with them like I do. I’ve got to be prepared for anything, at anytime, but can’t always keep my long term bag with me (unless I want to look like a weirdo). You have said “the mind is the most important survival tool”, I have to remember that at all times.
I have read other blogs & articles on survival but have never responded because I felt I didn’t have the perfect bug-out-bag. Your right there is no one fits all gear list. I love to backpack/hike/camp & have learned to lighten my pack (get rid of some unnecessary heavy items, tent/hiking boots etc). I think for me being mobile whether it’s by car, bike, or foot needs to be a possibility. Fight or Flight/Sit or Survive. The Native Americans lived off the land without all the useful items people mention , they did it their whole lives , with very little & were pretty well off. Unless I find myself in the middle of a war a Ruger 10/22 should be all I need. It would be ideal to only set traps & fish & gather to survive but I do realize their could be hostile enemies & I’ll need to have some form of weapon.
Thanks for all that your doing!

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Vote -1 Vote +1Ben Martino
September 17, 2010 at 11:19 am

Great stuff as always Dave ~

I have to agree…. everyone will have a different type of go bag and equipment… Someone who lives in say Maine, will need altogether different type stuff then someone who lives in say Arizona ! Each one will run into different type situations…

Here’s something that everyone can use though, no matter where you are…
Last year we had a crippling ice storm in Central Massachusetts and Southern NH… power was out in some places for over 3 weeks…..

Everyone says always have a battery operated portable radio….. BULL…. ALL the local radio stations, AM & FM in our area had no generators and were off the air…

The only stations we could get were Boston stations and they were over 65 miles away from the effected area… all we got from them was… “The Central part of the state is under an emergency due to an ice storm.” Duh ! Ya we knew that….
This made our portable radio useless for important information….

I have a portable, battery operated, hand held police/fire scanner… ( I spent 18 years in police work & 34 years in the fire service) With my scanner I was able to monitor all the police and fire radio traffic in my area…. hence I knew… what roads were closed, where trees were down, wires down, what shelters were open and a host of other important information that I just couldn’t get anywhere else…. It also has 6 built in weather channels….

Something everyone should think about having in their emergency supplies…
With this we got all the important information we needed to get us through the situation… This type of information is also gold during a shtf incident too…

Stay safe…
Ben

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Vote -1 Vote +1David Morris
September 17, 2010 at 11:26 am

Hey Ben,

Great suggestion.

A caveat to this is that, if possible, assign one person (or one person at a time) to listen to the scanner, filter out the important and pass THAT information on to others versus having multiple people tied to the radio for hours at a time. Information is great, but it can be a distraction as well.

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Vote -1 Vote +1G_man
September 17, 2010 at 11:34 am

Keep this highly instructive & life saving Praxis info coming our way, David.

You are one of very few who are genuinely knowledgeable, pragmatically principled, and indeed altruistic; willing to share your valuable ‘how-to’.

I for one, am gratefully soaking this up like thirsty sea sponge.

RKBA = Liberty

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Vote -1 Vote +1Cory
September 17, 2010 at 1:39 pm

David,

You are doing such a tremendous service with this site and newsletters.
I wish I would have been receiving it years ago.

I have a wife and five children. The considerations of being prepared have been daunting. I pick up something new every time that I read your newsletters. It helps me fill in the gaps. Thank you!

I purchased my first 72hr pack about four years ago to start our family preparedness plan. I was so disappointed with the quality of the products,( Flashlight, radio Etc) that I would not have been confident with it.

So be careful of what you are purchasing concerning these mass produced kits.

What I ended up doing was taking much of my spare time for a couple of months researching through Backpacking, outdoors, survivalist type magazines and web sights and google searches to find how they were ranking products. Everything from Backpacks, tents, knives, boots, compasses etc. And I actually found many consistencies across the board.

And those items were what I purchased and pulled together for each of our seven preparedness packs. I then needed to change my purchasing strategy. Piecing together a high quality preparedness pack is not cheep. But is well worth the investment. The lives of my family are priceless.

These are a couple of sites that may be valuable to you in your product search.
http://www.survivalequipt.com, http://www.maxpedition.com, and http://www.Adventuremedical.com to name a few.

I just know that if my family would need to use something that I purchased to assist in there potential survival. It had better work and work very well.

This weeks article has been specifically helpful to me concerning being aware of how we lair our potential needs.

Thanks again,
Cory

PS. After seeing Ben’s post. Radio’s are out and Scanners are in! thanks for your experience and info.

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Vote -1 Vote +1David Morris
September 17, 2010 at 1:54 pm

Thanks, Cory.

One of the most important things that you said was that you were disappointed with the quality of the items in the 72 hour kits that you purchased. That satement was a flashing neon light to me saying, “I actually opened up my 72 hour kit and tried stuff out.” That’s such an important thing to do. If you never use your gear until your life depends on it, you’re probably going to be disappointed. Good for you!

David

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Vote -1 Vote +1Cory
September 22, 2010 at 3:29 pm

Thanks David.

I couldnt agree with you more. You must try everything out. A flashlight for instants should be dropped multiple times on the ground, grass, rocky area and asphalt to test it for durability. The odds of dropping a flashlight are stacked against the flashlight. It’s going to happen.

After looking at the items in that first pack. The neon was flashing at me as well, too check everything out. It was that obvious. It was a 150.00 Survival pack. I should have known better. Lesson learned! Now I have and can help make others aware of not making the same mistake.

Also in my evaluation of my pack content. The quality was #1, but a close second was weight. My packs without food and water are est only 16-18 pounds. est 20-21lbs with firearm and ammo.

Cory

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Vote -1 Vote +1Cory
September 22, 2010 at 9:10 pm

David:

Concerning Flashlights:

It is amazing how they can now get so much light out of such small flashlights. Keep it light small and compact and multiple levels of light in one package. Much more light than a standard 2 D flashlight. And add versatility to your lighting needs, from reading a map to temp blinding a adversary. I consider these flashlights as my second multitool.

I researched them with 123A Lithium batteries and AAA and AA batteries.

Flashlights with 123A Lithium I would Recommend for size and weight are:
Surefire E1B Backup, LX1 Lumamax for ( EDC) ,(E1L and E2L Outdoorsman for Pack)

I have a Fenix LD1 (AA) Flashlight. It has been a great flashlight. It made it through the drop tests and I am confident in it. But the line is being discontinued for some reason from Maxpedition. ????

They both have there merits. The 123A Lithium has a ten year shelf life for example. And AAA and AA batteries are cheaper and plentiful as another example.

But in a long term situation, you may need to scavenge for battery’s. The probability of finding AAA or AA far out way the probability of finding 123A Lithium battery’s.

It is up to you too decide. I decided both since they are both small and very light weight.

What are your thoughts?

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jerry
September 17, 2010 at 10:24 pm

Hmmm…..I still see a problem with how you layer. Weight will always be an issue when it comes to survival. My pack is an old Medium alice ruck(it’s what I used when I was in the Nasty Guard back in the 80′s and 90′s). My overall pack weight is just a tad under 35 lbs. At 52, I’m not gonna pack the kitchen sink if I have to leave at moment’s notice….I’m not in the same shape I was when I was in my 20′s. Pets….I love them as much as the next person, but sometimes you may have to make some hard choices about Fido and Fluffy. I don’t want to offend any animal lovers here, just keep in mind…..you have to decide what your situation will allow. Here in Texas, it’s gettint to be weather extremes…..too hot, hurricanes coming further inland…..and for those of us here in Texas…..the Mexican Drug Cartels are making inroads into our communities. Tough decisions with tough choices which won’t be popular.

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Vote -1 Vote +1David Morris
September 17, 2010 at 10:41 pm

Hey Jerry, I guess I’m a little confused. Could you let me know what you meant when you said there was a problem with layering.

I don’t think anyone mentioned pets or Mexican drug cartels, but if they fit into layering, let me know.

And, actually, layering works especially well for people in their 50s and people who don’t want to pack the kitchen sink. Here’s why…

When you layer, you have the ability to drop a LOT of your gear if you are forced to move faster or if you are injured and can’t carry as much. You simply drop your pack, grab the next smallest layer, and take off. If you have the time, of course, you’d want to bury or otherwise cache the gear you’re leaving behind, but if you’ve just got to scoot, then you drop and scoot.

It’s actually the ultimate in adaptability…if you’ve got hauling ability, then you are set to take advantage of it. If not, you simply grab and go…no repacking, recalculating, or refiguring…just dump the big pack and go with the small pack.

In any case, if you see a way to improve on it, please do share.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jerry
September 17, 2010 at 10:56 pm

Ouch! Sorry David! I missed this point altogether. Me so sorry! Point taken….I know now what you were getting at. Thanks for the info…….

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Vote -1 Vote +1David Morris
September 17, 2010 at 11:00 pm

No problem at all. You’ve made a lot of GREAT input on several posts and I know you know your stuff. I was just hoping that you’d have some bit of info that would be a quantum leap in setting up survival kits :)

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jerry
September 17, 2010 at 11:48 pm

Difficult to specify here Dave……Most kits are customized unless you get fascinated by the Survival Trinket stuff they dangle in front of you down at Academy Sporting Goods. Overpriced, gaudy, and shiny! It’s things like this many people gravitate too and believe once in their possesion….they are safe from all dangers. I’ve seen it happen all too often. Many people do not put much thought into their safety or well-being. They are to busy looking at the latest electronic gidgets and gadgets and maxing-out their wornout credit cards “Praying” they will make to their next paycheck(hopefully not their last!) It’s best expressed as “Rubbing on my Lucky Rabbits foot. Lucky for you…but defintely not for the rabbit since he lost his foot and probably wound up in the stew pot!)

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jerry
September 17, 2010 at 11:04 pm

My pack is the basic in which I actually have two! One stays with me at work. The other stays at my apartment. I have a cache point and fallback position when the balloon goes up. Remind many of your readers….1.00 Stores, 99cent stores, Goodwills, Flea markets, as well as garage sales are great places for securing good items at relatively inexpensive prices. I bought a good amount of steel wool at a Flea Market in east Texas. The little mexican lady had no use for it and almost gave it to me for next to nothing! i have a co-worker who is like me(he is a first responder; I work in healthcare) and I have made a deal to get MRE’S for a bargain price. These meals are indiviual packets from returning soldiers who parcel them out. i get them for a fair price and I have them in my Bugout Bags as well as my stashpoints.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jerry
September 17, 2010 at 11:19 pm

Oh…Ok! I carry: 1. 5′x8′ camo tarp(Harbor Freight); 2.U.S. Combat Causualty blanket(eBay-12.00)(90 percent reflective property); 3. 2 canteens, 4. Small medical kit, 5. 2 pr socks, 6. facial masks(NiOsh approved), 7. Googles, 8. Special Air Services Combat knife(eBay-$105), 9. About (5) MRE’s, 10. Roll toliet paper, 11. G.I.

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Vote -1 Vote +1MP
September 17, 2010 at 11:19 pm

Concerning weapons, I think considering other alternatives to regular firearms would be very smart, especially in terms of urban survival, since firing off a shot in an urban setting may draw way more attention than you hoped for. Also, for some people, firearms may not even be an option if they happen to live in an area that doesn’t allow for firearms ownership or if unfortunate personal circumstances keep them from owning guns (felons).

Also, there’s a consideration for some, black powder weapons. Again, it combines the best of both worlds in terms of what I’m talking about. Even the cheapo cap & ball revolvers allow for fast follow up shots while still reaping the benefits of BP guns.

Another thing to consider too when it comes to long term survival situations may be the type of weapon, if you had to reload your ammo, some guns stand to be better candidates for reloading in the field than others. Revolvers and repeater longarms come to mind. One can underload ammo with BP and slugs made from fishing lures or make low power shotgun shells using store bought BB’s with toilet paper wads in front of a BP load. Primers can be popped out with a nail and pressed in with some relative ease using a block of wood as the base to press the primer into the shotgun shell.

Anyway, that’s my 2 cents coming from the gun nut side, everybody else is throwing out some definate good suggestions and concerns. I’m learning more and more each time I read.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Cory
September 22, 2010 at 4:11 pm

Staying undetected will be important. I like your Ideas of alternative means of protection.

I run into so many endless firearms debates and it really comes down to this. What will be potentially available as far as ammo and from what will be the source of it. Without ammo, your gun becomes a club or a paper weight. When you are choosing a firearm for your protection outside of the regions that you were discussing.

I’ve posted this on firearms discussion sites. I hope it will be helpful to you and all the readers.

Food for thought,

Lets face it. In a doomsday or less than scenario, and if we all need to bug out. There are only a few calibers that will make sense. Ammo will be scarce and the only abundance of ammo will be what the military’s use. Military and Police would be everywhere if this would occur.

Even the Police do not keep stockpiles of ammo. Many departments on tight budgets at times barely keep enough to cover there mandatory re-qualification requirements each year. This leaves the 40S&W as a questionable choice. Do to a large percent of police an federal agency’s are now using .40S&W. I for one prefer a 40S&W.

Bugging out will require bare bones needs. Carrying 500 rds or more may be a bit challenging. Especially if you are taking more than one firearm per person. If you have a family. It is better to have each family member carry a different firearm with different calibers for different tasks. Have each of them proficient with each gun.

This will really narrow the ammo choices, as far as long term quantity availability that you may be able to obtain over long periods of time.

As far as ammo that you may find in a shed etc somewhere. .22LR 12GA
USA Military Primary Ammo (9mm) ( .45acp mainly Special Ops quantity is ?able) ( .223- 5.56) (.308WIN – 7.62 NATO) (12GA) ( .50 Cal)
Other 7.62.39

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jerry
September 17, 2010 at 11:22 pm

11. G.I. Mess Kit, 12. Gerber multitool, CRKT folding pocket knife, 13. A handful of Chem Lights (6 green, 6 yellow), 14. Signal Mirror, 15. AR7 Explorer .22 cal rifle and (2) bricks of ammo(1100 rds.). There are some other minors items…I’ll get back to you on that.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jerry
September 17, 2010 at 11:39 pm

Just to let you know…I’m still reading all of your articles which i had printed up several weeks ago. A lot of good pointers and useful info. I have learned one thing..what is true today…may not be tomarrow. I’ve watched Les Stroud in Survivorman, the one epidsode of “apopcalyse man” on History channel, Jericho on SciFi channnel, and a few others that caught my interest. What is becoming more obvious are all of these programs are occurring on the telly more often than ever. Has anyone considered this question…..Why? Just some thought provoking insight. The other part of this question….Does anyone else watch this besides the fringe element(those of us who aren’t glued to the telly for Sports or American Idiot, etc). I’m glad I belong to the fringe….

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Vote -1 Vote +1MP
September 18, 2010 at 11:39 am

It is interesting that there are more TEOTWAWKI shows and documentaries out there, just like the “Life after people” series, showing how our infrastructure would degrade w/o intervention from modern society, would be interesting to imagine if small pockets of survivors had to live in such an environment. Also can’t forget the movies that have come out too, like “Book of Eli” among others that portray these type of situations.

As far as why, it is interesting, but apparently more and more people are showing interest in these hypothetical situatons since things seem to appear more and more like TSHTF will occur more sooner than later. While 15-20 years ago people portrayed “survivalists” as a fringe group of right wing gun nuts, now more and more people are starting to listen, which may be a good thing, the last thing we would want is more refugees to help after TSHTF.

The only other concern would be that people are looking to post apocalypse situations as another form of entertainment and something that will NEVER happen in their lifetime (think about post Katrina New Orleans). Of course its those same people who don’t think anything is gonna happen but when a killer quake or hurricane is breathing down their neck, will run frantic through every grocery store, hardware store, and gas station trying to stockpile supplies before their neighbors do so. It’s sad, and we see the same people do the same thing everytime.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Adriennie
September 18, 2010 at 7:36 am

Recently I started getting catalogs for Emergency Essentials. Has anyone ever bought items from them before? Is the quality/durability good? The website is Beprepared.com. Thanks for any help!

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Vote -1 Vote +1VikingLander
September 18, 2010 at 12:24 pm

Adriennie,

I get these catalogs every month also. They have some decent prices on some items, but you have to question the quality of a 4.95 multitool. My Leatherman Squirt P4 was $30, and I actually broke one of the plier jaws off it one day while applying axial rotational torque to it. Luckily Leatherman tools are guaranteed for life and they replaced it free. Not sure if I’d trust a cheaper version.
EE/BP has some decent prices on some good quality storable food. Mountain House is top of the line and been around for years; Provident Pantry makes some fairly palatable stuff also. I have eaten much of this product line during my years as a Scout (Looooong time ago!) and more recently have checked to make sure my adult taste can still take it – so far so good! I would suggest you order single servings of this stuff and try it first. One of the cardinal rules of food storage is “Store what you eat and eat what you store”. I would also stay away from 3 mo, 6 mo and 1 yr “deluxe packs”; you’ll be so freakin’ sick of freeze-dried granola with blueberries after 3 months! Their calorie-per-day estimates tend to be very carb-heavy and sometimes way off. Do some digging around and deal with some of the sites that give nutritional info (MH’s own website, eg.)

Here’s what in my 7 day kit, foodwise:
1
Brkfast Granola with Blueberries and Milk
Very Berry Crunchies
2 Colombian Supremo
Raw Sugar
Whole Milk 26% butterfat
Lunch Rice and Chicken
Refried Beans
Jalapeno Cheese Squeezers
Pilot Biscuits
Herb Tea w/ sugar
Dinner Sweet and Sour Pork with Rice
Garden Green Peas
Spicy Thai Noodle Soup
Rice Pudding with Raisins
Herb Tea w/ sugar
Snack 1 Hammer Food Bar (Almond/Raisin)
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 2 Juicy Jerky Beef Jerky
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 3 Organic Food Active Greens Bar
Hot Cocoa
Snack 4 2 Hershey SmartZone Bars
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
2
Brkfast Scrambled Eggs with Bacon
Richmoor Hash Brown O’Brien
2 Colombian Supremo
Raw Sugar
Whole Milk 26% butterfat
Lunch Spaghetti with Meat and Sauce
Sicilian Mixed Vegetables
Tiramisu
Instant Espresso (Medaglia d’Oro)
Raw Sugar
Dinner Mexican-Style Chicken with Rice
Whole Kernel Corn
Refried Beans
Vanilla Crème and Raspberries
Cocoa (w/ cayenne & cinnamon)
Snack 1 Very Berry Crunchies
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 2 Juicy Jerky Beef Jerky
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 3 Organic Food Active Greens Bar
Hot Cocoa
Snack 4 2 Hershey SmartZone Bars
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
3
Brkfast Granola with Blueberries and Milk
Pork Sausage Patties
2 Colombian Supremo
Raw Sugar
Whole Milk 26% butterfat
Lunch Hearty Stew with Beef
Garden Green Peas
Cheddar Cheese Squeezers
Pilot Biscuits
Freeze-dried Ice Cream Sandwich
Instant Ginger Honey Crystal Drink
Dinner Macaroni and Cheese
Diced Beef
SW Green Chile Sauce
Cheese Cake
Hot Cocoa
Snack 1 Very Berry Crunchies
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 2 Juicy Jerky Beef Jerky
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 3 Organic Food Active Greens Bar
Hot Cocoa
Snack 4 2 Hershey SmartZone Bars
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
4
Brkfast Scrambled Eggs with Bacon
Mountain Bear Mush (Couscous)
2 Colombian Supremo
Raw Sugar
Whole Milk 26% butterfat
Lunch Beef Stroganoff
Tuscan Mushroom Risotto
Three Berry Cobbler
Herb Tea w/ sugar
Dinner Turkey Tetrazzini
Whole Kernel Corn
Souper Split Pea Soup
Herb Tea w/ sugar
Snack 1 Very Berry Crunchies
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 2 Juicy Jerky Beef Jerky
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 3 Organic Food Active Greens Bar
Hot Cocoa
Snack 4 2 Hershey SmartZone Bars
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
5
Brkfast Granola with Blueberries and Milk
Wheat n’ Berries Oatmeal
2 Colombian Supremo
Raw Sugar
Whole Milk 26% butterfat
Lunch Pasta Primavera
Chicken Salad with Almonds
Pineapple Chunks
Herb Tea w/ sugar
Dinner Chicken Stew
Whole Kernel Corn
Buttermilk Biscuits
FD Mint Chocolate Chip Ice Cream
Herb Tea w/ sugar
Snack 1 Very Berry Crunchies
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 2 Juicy Jerky Beef Jerky
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 3 Organic Food Active Greens Bar
Hot Cocoa
Snack 4 2 Hershey SmartZone Bars
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
6
Brkfast Scrambled Eggs with Bacon
Organic Griddle Cakes
2 Colombian Supremo
Raw Sugar
Whole Milk 26% butterfat
Lunch Chili Mac with Beef
Southwestern Style Corn
Just Fruit Munchies
Cocoa (w/ cayenne & cinnamon)
Dinner Lasagna with Meat Sauce
Garden Green Peas
Garlic Pesto Fry Bread
Herb Tea w/ sugar
Snack 1 Very Berry Crunchies
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 2 Juicy Jerky Beef Jerky
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 3 Organic Food Active Greens Bar
Hot Cocoa
Snack 4 2 Hershey SmartZone Bars
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
7
Brkfast Granola with Blueberries and Milk
Maple Oat Scones
2 Colombian Supremo
Raw Sugar
Whole Milk 26% butterfat
Lunch Spaghetti with Meat and Sauce
Focaccia Parmesan Bread
FD Cheese Cake
PowerBar Endurance Drink
Dinner Noodles and Chicken
Whole Kernel Corn
Peasant Tomato Soup
Cinnamon Apple Crisp
Herb Tea w/ sugar
Snack 1 Very Berry Crunchies
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 2 Juicy Jerky Beef Jerky
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)
Snack 3 Organic Food Active Greens Bar
Hot Cocoa
Snack 4 2 Hershey SmartZone Bars
e-Fuel Electrolyte Drink (3 flavors)

It gives an average of just over 5000 (yes! 5000!) calories a day for a total weight of 24 lbs. I have the whole kit figured out in terms of protein (216g/day), fat (130g/day), carbs (750g/day) etc. If I have to push hard on foot for 7 days in cold weather, I will use every one of those 5000 calories and go to sleep each night wanting more! On the other hand, if I had to hunker down and shelter in place for a while, I can go to half rations or less and extend it for 2 or more weeks. Or share it with someone else (hmmm…)

The rehydration of this kit requires an average of 6 liters of water per day, which is 1.6 gals, which weighs about 13.3 lbs. I will either have to carry this or find and purify it as needed. My Ultralight GOOD pack weighs at just a hair over 11 lbs., so at most I am carrying 24 + 11 + 13 = 48 lbs.

Best advice is to learn to eat some of this stuff, store what you will eat, rotate stock regularly by eating the oldest stuff occasionally, either on camping trips or outings, where you can practice preparing it under “primitive” conditions,or just for fun in the kitchen. My personal favorite of the lot is Chili Mac with Beef mixed with the Southwestern Style Corn, woke up with a liberal shot of a decent hot sauce, followed by a heavenly hot cocoa w/ cayenne & cinnamon, while I watch the sunset across a fire. Makes a great evening…have fun!

Ready? We are…

VikingLander

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Vote -1 Vote +1Adriennie
September 18, 2010 at 4:14 pm

WOW, that’s ALOT of food! Will you share with me? LOL, jk. But thank you for your info and for responding to me-as you can see, I’m a newbie! ;)

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Vote -1 Vote +1David Morris
September 20, 2010 at 11:48 am

I’ve bought quite a bit from Emergency Essentials.

I’ve tried repeatedly to get in contact with the owners/management of Emergency Essentials for over a year. I’ve tried both to get them to carry my materials and to find out about improving the quality of some of the items that they include in their kits. None of my attempts have been returned to date. The store employees and managers have been quite helpful, but I haven’t had any success breaking through the next layer.

In short, I like their food. Their 72 hour kits and supplies, though, are part of the reason why I’m SO insistant that people test out everything in their 72 hour kits before trusting their lives to them. Some of the tools that are in their kits are of VERY low quality. Specifically, I’ve had problems with their multi-tools, shake flash lights, and radios. I would also look at the Samurai survival tool in person before buying it. It’s VERY inexpensive, but it’s made to VERY low standards. Overall, I am pleased with them, but it’s because I buy stuff with my eyes wide open.

They do a good job of helping people get all-in-one disaster survival supplies at affordable prices, but they sometimes do it by including items that, in my experience, just don’t work well. The obvious problem with that is that if people buy the kits and don’t test out the items included, they end up with a false sense of security and will probably be disappointed when they put the items to the test.

It’s tough…their 72 hour emergency kit sells for less than $50. My folder that I carry costs $60, my multi tool cost around $75, and my medical supplies cost WELL over $100. You just can’t include that kind of quality materials AND sell them for under $50. For $50, they do good…just as long as your expectations are in line with reality.

I am attempting to contact them again this morning…hopefully one of them will read this and get back to me :)

As a note, I have been trying to find a supplier of QUALITY 72-hour kits that I can endorse. I have NOT found one yet, but when I find one, I’ll let you know.

David

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Vote -1 Vote +1Scott
September 21, 2010 at 9:51 am

I’ve made a number of purchases from Emergency Essentials over the years. I completely agree that their inexpensive tools (the ones I’ve seen) are very poorly made. I would not want to trust my life with one of their pre-made kits. I’d much rather select my own individual items. I do have some of the “Samurai Survival Tools”. They are a useful tool – for the price. I thought they might be a good barter or charity item, as they are better than nothing for someone who is without. I include MREs as a part of my food storage. I tried Emergency Essentials’ one-month MRE deal. I audited what I received and it worked out to 1800 calories per day… Not a lot if you’re expending much energy at all. Also, the month supply included a VERY large quantity of refried beans and only one breakfast item. I wrote their customer service to suggest that they post the calorie count included in MRE bulk purchases. They replied that 1800 calories per day is plenty; it’s just that many Americans are used to much more… There are going to be some hungry, disappointed people who buy and store blindly, without auditing what they have. So, I will still order MREs, but I order them individually based on calorie and nutritional content.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Adriennie
September 21, 2010 at 10:28 am

Thanks David! I LOVE your site by the way and next month I will be taking the course! I’m a single mom with 2 kids ages 5 and 1(no family support) and I’m trying my best to ‘arm’ myself with the tools and knowledge we will need to survive. ..I was hoping to find a decent 72-hr kit for myself and my 2 kids that would save me the time spent from looking here and there to piece one together. It’s definitely not as easy as it looks! As far as assembling my gear, where would you suggest I start? Any particular brands or stores that are better than others? I know your super busy but any help is appreciated! THANKS!

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Vote -1 Vote +1Christy
September 21, 2010 at 6:37 pm

I’ve gotten a lot of food from them and really like it. My kids love the freeze dried fruit and it is a lot cheaper than the little Gerber packs for kids. I haven’t used much of their other tools and such.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Shawn M
September 25, 2010 at 1:59 pm

Adrienne,
Hi, I’ve bought several things from Emergency Essentials! VERY good quality, and excellent customer service!!
One thing I’ll tell you, if you’re considering getting powdered milk, get their mixing pitcher too……you’ll be surprised at how good it is!!! I couldn’t believe it was powdered, and I’m the one that made it!!!

Shawn

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Vote -1 Vote +1bandy jen
September 18, 2010 at 1:51 pm

this is very unique topic and i like it.

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Vote -1 Vote +1stupid
September 18, 2010 at 2:00 pm

at http://www.lonewolfdist.com JR does custom laser engraving on guns for a very reasonable price. so why not take Shawns blade protractor etching modification and have JR do it in a much more precise manner. it will not rub off and will not weaken the blade. and if you can think of any more useful designs or lists to keep so handy, they could be applied at the same time. and in color as well.

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Vote -1 Vote +1VikingLander
September 18, 2010 at 2:45 pm

Dave,
Great stuff, as usual. I have been at this for years (1995 to be exact) and your newsletters have made a HUGE diference in my particular stance. I am constantly re-evaluating my situation and my readiness vis-a-vis the current environment. I have not yet been in a position to purchase your course, but I’m close…

Meanwhile, the other day we had a terror of a thunder cell blow thru NYC and tear up the place. There are still trees down across streets and many many blocks closed as a result. Last night I was out driving around and I was amazed at the way some people take a disaster scenario as license to disregard the rules. What do I mean?

Just because some roads are blocked and traffic is particularly heavy and slow, some people seem to think it is OK to go thru red lights, make turns across safety zones, make u-turns where they’re not supposed to, and generally disregards the way things usually run; not that there aren’t plenty of people in NYC who disregard the rules everyday! My point is that it seemed to be a brief preview of what might occur in any kind of prolonged event.

Tonight on Discovery channel there is Aftermath: Population Overload, about a scenario where the population skyrockets and the chaos that might ensue from overburdened systems; this is a scenario I have yet to hear you touch on. Following that is a show called Collapse, based on the book by Jared Diamond. Promises to be an enlightening evening, no?

Keep up the good work and don’t forget to run a special discount offering in the spring, when I should finally be solvent enough to buy your course! Thanks…

Ready? We are…

VikingLander

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Vote -1 Vote +1Valerie Bate
September 19, 2010 at 7:02 am

I put together my own bag and hadn’t looked at it in some time. I have always thought I would be using it as a “get home” bag and as it is it would be fine EXCEPT what if I was out of town at a music event (which I love to do) say in FL?? I live in MO and that would be quite a hike to get home. I really, really appreciate all the info which has forced me to expand my thinking. My family and small group of friends who are prepping together have decided to take our packs out for one night in the woods and see how we fare. I think it’s going to be a big eye opener! Thanks everyone for all the great input!

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Vote -1 Vote +1Marcia
September 20, 2010 at 12:55 pm

David, thanks so much for explaining how you layer. I have read so many things now on many different kinds of sites and it gets a little confusing at times. I liked the way you explained the layering process. My husband and I have most of the items needed for short or longer term survival. I have arranged and rearranged and now I see I will be rearranging things again. But that is o.k. It is a learning process even though we have been prepping for the last 3 years now. It is definitely time and cost consuming. Instead of purchasing any ready made kits, we purchased items individually. Too many of the kits are “generic” and really don’t have the quality. For instance, getting sleeping bags that were good for 0 degree temperatures don’t come in a $50.00 kit. If you price out the items you want for longer term, I really suggest you do your research, compare items in quality and price and you will feel much better about spending the money and knowing you have something that is very useful and reliable for you and your family member. It takes longer and who knows how much time we have so get started now if you have not already. It someone would have told me 4 years ago that I would be preppping, I would of told them they were nuts. But I sure have changed my mind. My husband too. So don’t give up on family or friends who may roll their eyes when you talk about prepping. Keep on encouraging them. No doubt some of them will come around to like thinking. I love this site David! Thanks again!

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Vote -1 Vote +1Bob
September 20, 2010 at 2:05 pm

What if you are forced into a community shelter/camp area? Will all weapons such as guns, knives and other sharp items be confiscated? What about food and medical supplies… community property?

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Vote -1 Vote +1Dennis
September 20, 2010 at 4:10 pm

I noticed in this newsletter that you mentioned for people that can’t carry packs to use a bicycle, wheel barrow and those are good ideas. My wife and I are 61 and 68 for me. We can’t carry packs weighing 35-50 lbs which it seems the pack weights in the comments run. Our situation is far different than being in the city. We live in a rough area to move around on foot.
We live off the grid in AZ and are about 50 miles from the nearest decent sized town in which to shop. If a diaster occurred that’s a long way to walk and to carry a heavy pack, impossible for us. So I am modifiying a deer carrying cart to haul the stuff on. The cart has 15 inch wheels and can carry 300 lbs. I put wire mesh between the bars on the cart to keep items from hanging down and dragging. I also put a skid plate in case the rear part of the cart hits against the rocks. I took a pistol belt and old G.I. suspenders to strap ourselves to the cart, keeping our hands free. It is also easy and fast to get out of the harness immediately if need be. The trick to making this easier to pull is to balance the load. The balance point being over the axel. I’m not done yet and yet have to test it out and I will keep any interested parties up to date if there are any. It appears that it will work well, especially on hard surfaced roads. I am taking pictures as I go. I think the cart is a good alternative, even in the city. We have a SUV which will carry the cart and all. It comes in a flat narrow cardboard box and is easy to carry in the car. It is easily put together.
We have a route planned.We’ll travel at night on R&R tracks where few people are. That way there are no drastic sloped hills to fight with like you get on the highways. Traveling at night we’ll be cooler than in the day. It’s gets hot in AZ and we’ll use less water. If it is in the winter we’ll stay warmer by moving during the coldest part of the day and sleep when it is warmer. Alot of the country that we have to negotiate is wild and I think the cart will work pretty well over wild terrain. I have tried to pull a wagon and push a wheelborrow around our 40 acres and it doesn’t work all that well. It is very energy consuming.
Even though we don’t live in the city, your course has some very good info for us. I’m really enjoying it and learning a lot. It will be something a person should go back regularly and re-read. Repetition is a cornerstone of learning, and practice. Thanks. BE PREPARED.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Deborah
September 24, 2010 at 1:40 pm

Dear Dennis,

Your idea sounds quite interesting and I would like to see this contraption! I have been also thinking about the weight issue. One note (that you may already be aware of) we are railroaders by trade and have seen terrible accidents involving folks that never heard the train coming. I realized first hand how true this is was when I was sent to the yard at night and couldn’t hear the cars coming at me on the tracks! Sound is behind the locomotives, not in front. That is a very dangerous situation. Be safe!

Deborah

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Vote -1 Vote +1Dennis
September 27, 2010 at 11:34 am

Deborah: Thanks for the comment about the train and being able to hear it. I was assumeing that trains wouldn’t be running because of what ever disastrous event happened. I will definately keep it in mind. Hopefully travelling at night we’ll be able to see the trains light before it’s too late. Maybe I could rig up a rear view mirror on it. Sounds stupid but might work.
You can view the cart on http://www.sportsmansguide.com. I believe that they have it for sale now for around $50. I paid a little more for mine. You can get them made out of steel or aluminum. Sorry, I haven’t made a test trip as we just got hit with a serious problem and it has been taking all our time. I guess I will need your email address to send you some pictures. I don’t know how to send it to this address. I guess I’ll try and write another note and include the pictures with it so you don’t have to give your email address to a stranger. We’ll try and get some pictures taken in the next day or two and test the cart out on our sloped driveway. thank you for your interest. Dennis

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Vote -1 Vote +1David Morris
September 27, 2010 at 12:05 pm

The statement about the sound could be mis-interpreted. I think what Deborah is saying is that, in some cases, the horn is at the back of the locomotive or on a 2nd or 3rd locomotive.

The train will NOT get to you before the sound does. The sound will travel at approximately 750 miles per hour and the train will be traveling much slower, so, if you’re alert and listening for the horn, you will hear it.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Pat T.
September 20, 2010 at 9:41 pm

This is all good stuff, but it would be nice if a “print” feature was offered. Every time I try to print my computer locks up. I would like to add this to my ‘What If’ folder for future reference.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Rick
September 22, 2010 at 11:57 am

Just click on the Print icon on your web browser (if using I.E.) or goto file/print, or even do a print screen, or highlight all text and then right-click and select “print”, or do a file/save as/ and choose to save it as a text file and then open the text file and print it. I have a couple more suggestions if you want them? :)

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Vote -1 Vote +1Rick
September 22, 2010 at 10:30 am

Hey David,

Great stuff as usual. I have been reading your weekly’s for a few months now and definitely enjoy it. It’s also nice to know that there are many more people out there that think like me. Was starting to wonder if I just had “issues” lol…kidding of course. I was just taught at a young age to always be aware of your surroundings. Show confidence and you will be less likely to be in a bad situation (as far as people go with trying to find easy targets to rob, etc) but not overdo it to where others feel threatened. Learn anything and everything you desire to better yourself (knowledge, wisdom, strategy – planning contingency upon contingency in your head, and troubleshooting are the MOST important tools), and have a general survival mindset (I want to be alive and safe). I love camping and outdoors type stuff, and my buddies always laugh (good natured of course) when we are hanging by the campfire talking…I will start building a 3 tiered shelf system with twine and sticks. They don’t laugh after I’m done and seeing how useful it is. It’s all about using what’s available and being inventive as well. The more you do that the more you add to your tools that you have to help you out better the next time.

Anyways, on to the subject at hand. Everyone definitely WILL have different needs as far as “survival bags” go. There is a ton of info and great advice out there and it can be overwhelming. My advice is simple. Make your own bag like David suggests. It is more time consuming and expensive, but it almost becomes a hobby and its actually pretty fun all in its own. The reason is, most of the time those all in one kits for any type hobby usually have a bunch of cheapo stuff and include a lot of stuff you would never need anyways. Some guidelines for piecing it together is to always think about weight, space/size, durability, and functionality. You will tend to want or need items that weigh less, are more compact in size, very good quality, and are actually useful and can serve many purposes possibly. Several methods for being “rescued” such as whistle, signal mirror, firestarting. Several methods for fire starting such as 2-3 lighters, waterproof matches 2-4 boxes, bars, magnifying glass, rope. Various light sources such as the before fire, compact flashlights (I prefer the headlamp type that also have clips and use SMALL circle batteries), those 10 hours emergency bars, small candles, etc). Various tools for getting things done such as a multipurpose tool, knives, wiresaw, rope. Water purifying methods and containers, and methods for food (knives, guns, wire for snares, fishing equipment (not the tackle box just like 3-8 various sized hooks, weights, a couple bobbers, etc.). Much more items as well, but all of this stuff does not take up much room at all and weighs about 20 pounds ish.

I personally like to use the heavy duty plastic bags/containers that bedsheets come in to hold my various “kits”. They are small, but not tiny, retain there shape quite well with the wire liner yet will conform as needed, and are water resistant but not water proof. Then all of those kits or modules fit into my “SHTF” bag. I do a lot of my shopping from ebay and home depot, and a lot of the stuff you will want to include you have around your house anyways. I will be more than happy to share all my stuff if anyone is interested, but I know I have already written a novel so I will stop now…you really CAN go on and on about this subject.

Rick

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Vote -1 Vote +1Deborah
September 24, 2010 at 1:47 pm

Hi Rick!

Thanks for this list, Rick. I will copy it and see if I have missed anything. I really appreciate all of the ideas (especially the plastic bags that I kept). I didn’t know why, but now I do!

Deborah

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Vote -1 Vote +1Cory
September 23, 2010 at 1:57 pm

Hi David,

I have compiled my pack list and some excerpts from replies I have placed on your site and other forums. I have put together a Blog and I will be sending it out this evening. You will be the first to see it if you see this reply before tomorrow.
I hope it can be helpful and useful to you and your readers. I really enjoy your site. Thank you.

Being prepared with quality equipment you can depend on. One Man’s Research.

I have a wife and five children. The considerations of being prepared have been daunting.
I purchased my first 72hr pack about four years ago to start our family preparedness plan. I was so disappointed with the quality of the products, ( Flashlight, radio Etc) that I would not have been confident with it.

So be careful of what you are purchasing concerning these mass produced kits. It was a $150.00 Survival pack. I should have known better. Lesson learned! Now I have and can help make others aware of not making the same mistake.

What I ended up doing was taking much of my spare time for a couple of months researching through Backpacking, outdoors, survivalist type magazines and web sites, google searches and U-tube sites to find how they were ranking products. Everything from Backpacks, tents, knives, boots, compasses etc. And I actually found many consistencies across the board.

And those items were what I purchased and pulled together for each of our seven preparedness packs. I then needed to change my purchasing strategy. Piecing together a high quality preparedness pack is not cheap, but is well worth the investment. The lives of my family are priceless.

These are a couple of sites that may be valuable to you in your product search.

http://www.survivalequipt.com,
http://www.maxpedition.com,
http://www.Surefire.com
http://www.Adventuremedical.com to name a few.

I just know that if my family would need to use something that I purchased to assist in their potential survival. It had better work and work very well!

The content of this pack is of very good quality. Many people depend on these items in real life environments where their lives could be at risk. From Military, Government Agencies, Police, Adventurers to the everyday carry (EDC) for responsible citizens. There are always higher price points and arguably higher quality items. But my research and findings are a blend of quality, weight and a reasonable price point.

I hope that my findings will be helpful to you and your future safety and potential survival.

Quality Pack Considerations: GRAB and GO/BUG OUT BAG

This is my family’s Pack contents. Some variations of items in a couple of my children’s packs, but not many concerning the pack and Storage for BUG OUT BAG:
This is the first of several layers I have prepared. There are some redundancies and overlap in this pack. I do this because I can reduce this pack down to a much smaller everyday carry (EDC) pack if necessary.

Packs and Storage:

Maxpedition Gearslinger- Kodiak $ 137.00 , Sitka $127.00 or Monsoon $129.00 There are many color variations. Your packs do not need to look like a military pack.
Maxpedition Barnacle $23.99
Maxpedition 10” X 4” Bottle Holder $36.99
Maxpedition M-1 Waistpack $26.99
Maxpedition M-2 Waistpack $23.99
Maxpedition Cocoon Pouch $13.99
Maxpedition TacTile Pocket – Large $27.99
Maxpedition 4.5” Clip on Phone Holster $19.99
Overboard Waterproof Dry Pouch 4.5” x 6” $ 5.00
Camelbak Omega Water Beast 100 OZ est $36.00
Witz-Wrapper Sunglasses Case $9.95
Witz- Lens Locker/Glasses Case $9.95

S.T.R.I.K.E. Speed Clips 12 for $15.00
2” Web Belt $ 10.00

DENTAL MEDIC Weight: 2 oz Size: 5″ x 4.25″ x 1″
Dental
5 Cotton Rolls,

1 Temporary Cavity Filling Mixture
1 Dental Floss
1 Tea Bag, 100% Natural Pekoe Tea
5 Cotton Pellets
1 Wax Rope
3 Tooth Picks

Medication
2 Anbesol/Orasol, Benzocaine 20%, .75 g
$15.00

Adventure Medical
POCKET SURVIVAL PAK Weight: 3.9 oz Size: 4″ x 5″ x 0.652″
Duct Tape
1 Duct Tape, 2″ x 26″
Instrument
4 Safety Pins
1 Pencil
Sewing
1 Sewing Thread, Bobbin #69, Nylon
1 Sewing Needle, #18, Chenille
Survival Instructions
1 Waterproof Survival Instructions
Survival Tools
1 Scalpel Sterile, Disposable, #22 Blade
1 Signal Mirror, Rescue Flash
1 Whistle, Rescue Howler
1 Spark-Lite
4 Tinder Quick
1 Compass, Button, Liquid Filled
1 Aluminum Foil, Heavy Duty, 3 Sq. Ft.
1 Waterproof Paper
1 Fresnel Magnifier
6 Safety Wire, Stainless Steel, (6 ft of 0.020″)
10 Nylon Cord, #18, Braided, (10 ft. 100lb test)
4 Fish Hook, #10
2 Split Shot, Lead B
1 Snap Swivel, Size 12
1 Pocket Survival Pak Contents List
$34.00

2- QUIKCLOT® TRAVEL 25G $9.99 each
Weight: 25g Size: 25g

ULTRALIGHT / WATERTIGHT .9 – 2010 EDITION
Group Size: 1-4 people Trip Duration: 1-4 Days
Bandage Materials
2 Dressing, Gauze, Sterile, 2″ x 2″, Pkg./2
5 Bandage, Adhesive, Fabric, 1″ x 3″
2 Dressing, Non-Adherent, Sterile, 3″ x 4″
1 Bandage, Conforming Gauze, 3″
3 Bandage, Adhesive, Fabric, Knuckle
3 Dressing, Gauze, Sterile, 3″ x 3″, Pkg./2

Bleeding
1 Trauma Pad, 5″ x 9″
1 Gloves, Nitrile (Pair), Hand Wipe
Blister / Burn
2 Moleskin, Pre-Cut & Shaped

Duct Tape
1 Duct Tape, 2″ x 50″

Fracture / Sprain
1 Bandage, Elastic with Velcro, 2″

Instrument
1 Splinter Picker/Tick Remover Forceps
3 Safety Pins

Medication
4 Ibuprofen (200 mg), Pkg./2
2 After Bite Wipe
1 Aspirin (325 mg), Pkg./2
3 Antihistamine (Diphenhydramine 25 mg)
4 Diamode (Loperamide HCI 2 mg), Pkg./1

Wound Care
1 Syringe, Irrigation, 10 cc, 18 Gauge Tip
1 Wound Closure Strips, 1/4″ x 4″, Pkg./10
6 After Cuts & Scrapes Anethestic/Antiseptic Wipe
1 Tape, 1″ x 10 Yards
3 Alcohol Swab
1 Tincture of Benzoin Topical Adhesive
1 Cotton Tip Applicator, Pkg./2
4 Triple Antibiotic Ointment, Single Use
$36.00

Direction and Surveillance
Compass- Silva Guide 426 Graphite $25.00
Brunton Lite- Tech 8X22 Waterproof Monocular $16.99

Communications
Grundig Mini 400 Super Compact AM/FM/SW $35.00
10-AA Batteries $8.00
Waterproof Notebooks 3”x5” 50 sheet $ 4.95
Soft Grip Pen-Waterproof Ink Space-Tec Soft Grip Pen $9.95
Hand Held Scanner (Battery Operated) Presently Researching

Flashlights and Light Sources:

Concerning Flashlights:
It is amazing how they can now get so much light out of such small flashlights (LED). Keep it light small and compact and multiple levels of light in one package.
They produce much more light than a standard 2 D flashlight. And add versatility to your lighting needs, from reading a map to temporarily blinding an adversary. I consider these flashlights as my second multi-tool.

I researched them with 123A Lithium batteries and AAA and AA batteries.

Flashlights with 123A Lithium I would Recommend for size and weight are:
Surefire E1B Backup, LX1 Lumamax for ( EDC) ,(E1L and E2L Outdoorsman for Pack)

Fenix LD10 – I have a Fenix LD10 (AA) Flashlight. It has been a great flashlight. It made it through drop tests and I am confident in it. But the line is being discontinued for some reason from Maxpedition. ????

They both have their merits. The 123A Lithium battery has a ten year shelf life for example. And AAA and AA batteries are much less expensive and plentiful as another example.

But in a long term situation, you may need to scavenge for batteries. The probability of finding AAA or AA batteries far out way the probability of finding 123A Lithium batteries in your search.

It is up to you to decide. I decided both since they are both small and very light weight.

Surefire – E1L $ 129.00 E2L $139.00
SF12BB Box of 12 (123A)Lithium Batterries $21.00
Fenix LD-10 $56.00
10 AA Batteries $8.00

Light:
2-24hr Candles $5.00
10- 12 hr Glow Sticks $25.00

Knives and Multi-tools

A quality Knife is a must! Do not skimp in this area in purchasing items for your pack. Like a fire arm, the debate could go on forever. These Fixed blades by my research have been proven and you are not paying custom knife prices.

Fixed Blade Knife
Cold Steel SRK est $100.00 RAT RC5 est $150.00 KA BAR Fighting Knife est $80.00

Folding Knife and Multi-Tools
CRKT M-16-14 Special Forces Tanto AutoLAWKS, Veff Combo Edge $65.00
Gerber Multi-Plier 400 compact Sport $ 40.00
Gerber Shortcut $30.00

Water Filtration:
Katadyn Extream XR Filtered water bottle 32oz $49.95
Katadyn Spare Filter $35.00
Potable Aqua Water Purification Tablets $6.00

Fire:
2 butane lighters $3.00
Magnesium Fire Starter $9.99
2 packs- water proof matches $1.00
12 Fire sticks fire starter $2.00

Cooking and Eating
Esbit Pocket Stove $9.95
Esbit Pocket Stove Fuel ( 12 Tablets) $5.99
Utensil Set $5.00
P-38 Military Can Opener $1.00

Warmth and Shelter
50ft Paracord $20.00
MPI Outdoors Al-Weather Blanket $15.00

Tent
Eureka -Solitaire 1-person tent $60.00-$80.00
Eureka- 75 D Polyester Footprint $29.99

Firearms:
Be sure to purchase from a reputable firearm company with a great track record of quality and reliability. Best to check Stats on each of any firearm you intend to purchase.

Debate on what is the best firearm to own; I believe is some people’s favorite pastime.

I think the best one is the one that works and has a record of working every time.

You will find a firearm in, I would say every reputable manufacturer that would fit that bill. So it will come down to your personal preference.

Pistols:
High end Price: H&K, Sig Sauer and Kahr etc.
Mid end Price: Springfield Armory, Glock, Smith and Wesson and Ruger, Berretta etc.
Low end Price: Not an option for Survival

Rifles: Tika, Sako, Remington, Winchester, Savage etc.

Shotguns: Mossburg, Remington, Winchester, FN, Bennelli etc.

Semi Auto Rifles: S&W, Ruger , Stag, H&K, Sig Sauer, Berretta, Robinson, AR, AK, AKS,SKS, MAK-90 etc

Ammunition: Again, debate is endless on caliber and ballistics Etc. Etc. It really comes down to your proficiency with your firearm. Ability to place a shot where it needs to go in a high stress situation.

My uncle worked in the pathology and histology area of the medical profession. He has mentioned to me many times that the majority of deceased that were brought into the hospital from gun shoot wounds were killed by a .22LR. He explained that this was common in any hospital statistics. So yes, obviously a 22LR can kill a person. They are not an over powered Air Soft Guns.

Food for thought,
Let’s face it. In a doomsday or less than scenario, and if we all need to bug out. There are only a few calibers that will make sense. Ammo will be scarce and the only abundance of ammo will be what the military’s use. Military and Police would be everywhere if this would occur.

Even the Police do not keep stockpiles of ammo. Many departments on tight budgets at times barely keep enough to cover their mandatory re-qualification requirements each year. This leaves the 40S&W as a questionable choice. Due to a large percent of police and federal agency’s are now using 40S&W and it will be accounted for and diminished quickly. I for one prefer a 40S&W.

Bugging out will require bare bones needs. Carrying 500 rds or more may be a bit challenging. Especially if you are taking more than one firearm per person. If you have a family, It is better to have each family member carry a different firearm with different calibers for different tasks. Have each of them proficient with each gun.
This really narrow the ammo choices, as far as long term quantity availability that you may be able to obtain over long periods of time.

As far as ammo that you may find in a shed etc somewhere. .22LR- 12GA
USA Military Primary Ammo (9mm) ( .45acp mainly Special Ops- quantity is ?able) ( .223- 5.56) (.308WIN – 7.62 NATO) (12GA) ( .50 Cal)
Other 7.62.39

I hope this has been helpful,
God Bless,
C. Dailey

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Vote -1 Vote +1Boomer
September 23, 2010 at 4:11 pm

The Colony Episode 9

This is the first time I’ve watched the show. The assault by 20+ people against the group was nothing more than entertainment. In a real situation, people would have died. Early in a survival situation, there might not have been any deaths. But 7 weeks into it, people would be getting really scared about their chances of survival and the violence would have been extreme.

In is the length of time you see some tribalism beginning to develop, and roles are becoming more well defined. There current position is not defensible. It is too spread out for their numbers.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Mad Dawg
September 24, 2010 at 5:54 am

Thanks for everybody’s information!
I have a female friend who is just starting out in the art of prepping & could definitely use as much info from single women & anybody that can be of benefit to her. She is a sponge so far & would take away any advice or suggestions that you may have. I’ve helped her to get inspired to learn more & I have given her some basic tools for survival but she knows that she will need much more. She has read the entire blog & will be subscribing to the newsletter. David Morris she would greatly appreciate your concerns & everybody else who has useful knowledge.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Doug
July 28, 2012 at 5:49 pm

Dave, If you have something that it is critical to keep cold, and you are traveling by vehicle, look into one of these small refrigerated containers (to cool a 6 pack) that work of the 12 volt system. The outside gets hot enough to cook with and the inside stays cold. I have not found any of the units that are efficient so a small generator and extra fuel would be needed for moving away from the vehicle. The efficiency of these units is low so, at least initially, ice would be needed to quickly cool one but, as long as the battery lasts, it will keep things refrigerated as long as the cooler is not entered too often.

If I were installing one of these on my car I would also add an additional battery, with a cut out switch/circuit, so that it could not drain my main car battery.

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Vote -1 Vote +1curly
July 30, 2012 at 1:26 am

I have some tips for the ladies.
1. Clean the purse and add items for example in mine is
Rain poncho in vacuum seal bag to save space and a small flash light hooked on should strap, cell phone, and a outside pocket for a small water bottle
Folding knife, med kit with wrap bandage and small containers for ibuprofen, allergy,
diarrhea pills, 10 – 250mg amoxicillin capsules, and various travel packets of first aid cream, anti itch cream etc.safety pins,
Small bottles of shampoo, conditioner, wide tooth comb, dental floss, eye glass cleaner,
Hand sanitizer, wash cloth and hanky in zip-lock bag, travel Kleenex, bug stick, and
sample size make-up, lotion, small sewing kit, lip balm, female pads
Folding water bottle, lighter, matches, gum, 2 packet hot chocolate, 4 Tiger Milk bars,
Energy Mints and of course a wallet. While I still need to add some items such as pocket water filter and tooth paste etc. the bag weighs less than ten pounds and is my everyday carry bag. I have what is called a travel purse that has inside pockets for organizing, and outside pockets as well. Ladies, baby wash cloths pack nice for that time of month and can be held in place with safety pins and wash out with soap. In the trunk of the car I have other bags with food, clothing, small tent, tarps, cooking supplies, wool blanket, sleeping bag, emergency blankets, car repair kit, and items listed above in larger quantities, and a muck cart to help me transport them. I also have an office bag that converts to a back pack because it fits by back better than any back pack I have tried. That is my leave it and run bag that I took out the laptop padding and it fits enough stuff to last at least three days. I found the front pen pockets to be great places for lighters, shampoo bottles, knifes, cording etc. In the back seat of the car is a fanny pack I found at a garage sale years ago that was made to be a small school bag. In this is a small bottle of Dr. Bronners soap that I added essential oils to and this is my washing, and toothpaste soap. I can fit many of the items that I listed for the purse but changed the poncho to drop cloth plastic. I also have a small cook bag (1 metal cup) attached to the strap, and a water bottle carrier bag, and a large size golfer ball bag with food that has a clip. Another bag in the bag seat has 4 bottle of water that equals a gallon that has a should strap. There are other items but this should give the lady looking for help some ideas. Also shop garage sales etc. and grocery shop by sales to get more food items. It may take awhile but if you buy a case of spaghetti on sale that will allow you enough until the next sale and your supplies will start to add up. Also look for candles, and camping items at garage sales and local 2nd time around places. I can get taper candles 4 for a buck at mine. Remember that everything must be duplicate somewhere in the house, shed, or relative or friend. Everything you use now must be built up to last a year or more. Start at dollar stores for some of the food items will help a lot. Remember to look for good containers at these places to store dry goods and get any sizes that fit the place you live in. After all what good will the food do you if bugs and rodents eat before you do. Once you got a start and save money this way use that for items like extra fuels from gas to kerosene or what ever you use. Remember to get extra glues, tape, nails etc. for repairs these come in handy even during times of unemployment or just saving money. Remember to practice with your to go bags. I am 52 and had some injuries so now I working on walking a mile, and when I get that back to a good time I will do it with my fanny pack system on, and then my back pack system. Eventually, I will hike to a camp site about 15 miles from house that is near a relative in case my bag is not adequate. My tent for this will be the two person pup tent that is easy to carry. Also, in order to save money to buy items you need (if your on city water like me) use your bath water to flush your toilet, this will allow you to save drinking water in jugs for emergency without raising your bill and rainwater for washing your vehicle save a lot also. Hope this give you some ideas and good luck to you.

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