{ 80 comments… read them below or add one }

Vote -1 Vote +1Louis Anderson
June 12, 2011 at 1:10 pm

Great list, I never would have thought of the whistle and I have one. The multi meter is something I have and use frequently. Sadly, most people don’t know how to use it. The $3 variety sometimes have reliability problems and should be checked before it goes in the bag. I never go anywhere without my medium size swiss (genuine) army knife. It has two sizes of common screwdrivers plus a philips, can opener,bottle opener. plus other useful items. Peroxide is very useful and can be added to suspect water for purifying. If it creates bubbles its killing bacteria and the bubbles are pure o2.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Buck Crosby
June 12, 2011 at 3:25 pm

How about swimming pool water purification tablets , they come in several sizes and several different containers . They are a solid form of bleach and store easily in a sealable container .

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Wayne Johnson
June 13, 2011 at 10:02 am

What is a Leatherman?

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+2 Vote -1 Vote +1Evan
June 13, 2011 at 10:14 am

Wayne, a Leatherman is a “multi-tool” that has a number of different tools in one. They almost always have pliers and a knife and other tools depending on what you purchase. Think swiss army knife on steroids. :)

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Vote -1 Vote +1Carl Stoldt
December 12, 2011 at 3:19 pm

A Leatherman is an all-purpose tool. It has a knife, screwdrivers, pliers, and a kitchen sink attached. You can pool them up on Amazon. They have many generic forms too, but make sure you get a quality one. You don’t want it to fall apart when you need it.

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+7 Vote -1 Vote +1tjisse
June 13, 2011 at 10:21 am

Vinegar is good for treating insect bites, cleaning smaller wounds, sterilizes food preparation areas/containers. It is a very good deoderant and cures smelly feet when feet are dampened twice a day for three days followed by clean , vinegar soaked when washed, socks and the inside of footwear dampened down for three days with vinegar as well.
Beef that has gone green can be washed with vinegar, cooked and eaten without harm.
Honey is a natural food but also a superior treatment for any and all skin wounds including 3rd degree burns. Even if there is dirt in the wound and no cleaning material just put honey and it’s anti fungal/bacterial properties take care of it. Both are definites for a 3 day BOB and your homes.
Your rubbish bin bags which you call garbage bags, a term I reserve for politicians, also make sleeping bags in the rain and when cut open and strung over a rope/string a very quick tent.
From Zambia, peaceful Africa where food is natural

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Vote -1 Vote +1Glenn Finley
November 1, 2011 at 11:04 am

Excellent advice, tjisse, every bit of it. Many people overlook the uses of both vinegar and honey, and both are true miracle foods. One other thing, for everyone: Instead of just large garbage bags, the contractor-grade bags are much stronger and more durable. They cost a little more, but are worth many times the extra cost when you need something strong. you can find them at any large home improvement store or hardware store, but I prefer those from large stores over the local hardware store type.

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Vote -1 Vote +1ron bennett
July 10, 2011 at 3:36 pm

great list keepem coming…thanks

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Vote -1 Vote +1Larry
July 11, 2011 at 10:26 am

Compass and a joke book. NOw your ready to survive.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Andre
September 22, 2011 at 12:33 am

jokebook…brilliant! I have been in numerous situations. Music, books even sweets are a good “picker-upper” for when (not if) you are feeling a bit down. Well done Larry.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jenny V as in Viking....
July 21, 2011 at 9:11 am

The list is great. Thank you. What is being expected, other than worsening weather across USA and other places around globe? USA has had stable weather for about 3000 years. It was told in 1980 on my blk and wht TV aired from Bowdoin/Harvard/ etc that weather is going to change. It started from very dry hot summers, for making hay to rather humid summers about the 70s. And wilder weather /storms from west moving into North East etc. about the 70s Other than living in tribal tents to move out of the storms harm or underground instone , but roofed , sunlit by tubes, pyrimids, mail box out front of mound, driveway, to nothing but a troll door in, might work, what are all you survival people expecting?

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+3 Vote -1 Vote +1Damon1
August 1, 2011 at 2:05 pm

Jenny: We are not expecting anything, but when the “unexepected” happens what are you ready for? Remember the floods in Louisiana from “catrina” remember the tornadoes in Joplin Mo. or the earthquakes in Japan? Would you be ready to suvive on your own til “the help that your waiting for” arives?

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jeff
July 21, 2011 at 7:32 pm

When dried beef from China was found to be harmful to pets a few years back, I reverted to purchasing one of the cheapest meats I could find to make jerky for my dogs with a Hydrator. The meant turned out to be London Broil, which is fairly inexpensive in Texas. So, about every 10 days, I cut and dehydrate jerky for my dogs and if the SHTF, I’ll have ready made jerky to take with if I have to Bug Out. Another food item we feed our dogs (Flintriver Dry) has enough nutrition in its ingredients that a human could eat and survive on it if necessary. Hey, eating dry dog food won’t be tasty, but it beats starving to death.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Michael Click
August 2, 2011 at 4:26 pm

I agree with you in principal about eating pet food. However, I would suggest that you try it in a less than critical situation. At one point in time I had some dog food stashed as an emergency food supply. The type I had was a semi-dry form that looked like hamburger patties. The thought was that it was something that wouldn’t be eaten until things were at their worst. I decided to test ‘em out just in case. OMG! It was like eating plasicene clay. Playdough would have been better. I can’t say that I’d rather die of starvation rather than eat that dog food, but I’d rather have eaten grass or thistles than eat that crap. I have eaten dog biscuits (as a child) and they aren’t too bad. Trust but verify before trusting too much on something like dog food as an emergency food supply.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Adam in England
December 31, 2011 at 8:10 am

I’m wid’ya exactly on that Michael. I treid my cats food , both dry and wet stuff, and I think it woudl lead to me hinking my stomach up if I had persisted beyong one mouthful. The draw back is tha tI then woudl of emptied my guts of what remaining food I had in them thus making me more hunrgy in a survival situation.

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Vote -1 Vote +1David Morris
December 31, 2011 at 11:16 am

To top it off, cat & dog food is normally more expensive per calorie and per gram of protein than basic human food.

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+2 Vote -1 Vote +1John Tank
July 25, 2011 at 11:53 am

Uhmm…Don’t forget to have a number of firearms and self defense training as none of this preparation will do you any good if do not have the ability to protect and defend it! The “have nots”, some of whom already dwell in the existence you fear so much, will have no problem helping themselves to your property. History shows that when society loses structure, specifically law enforcement, would be criminals feel a sense of entitlement and opportunity.
Criminals at large become bolder and more violent. Rioting, looting, gang activity, murders, assaults will be the norm. If you are the only guy walking around with a jug of clean water – prepare to be punched in the face and robbed by thugs without hesitation. Furthermore, don’t expect help from onlookers as the same attitude of self preservation you are promoting turns most of the population into cowards unwilling to risk life or injury for their neighbor.

You see, while it is correct to be prepared for catstophe, it is more important to be bold, protected, and intelligent about your future existence.

We must look beyond ourselves and our own selfish needs – it makes more sense to have a community plan in place as there is strength in numbers, comfort in fellowship and peace in helping others in need. The strong must protect the weak from evil people.

Have faith in Christ!

JT

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1A. Phillips
August 4, 2011 at 11:15 am

Amen, Brother(or Sister)! Trust in our Lord first!

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Vote -1 Vote +1Glenn Finley
November 1, 2011 at 11:09 am

We trust in our Lord, too, but for those things that He doesn’t take care of, I have our Glocks, SKS, and a 12-ga. pump for backup, along with training at Front Sight and a life membership there to continue training and keep the skill set sharp.

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Vote -1 Vote +1George
November 11, 2011 at 10:55 am

Amen! I am going to train there as soon as possible!

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Vote -1 Vote +1Adam in England
December 31, 2011 at 8:16 am

I know what you say John. In the UK firearms are rare but when the criminals do use them they are usually MAC10s or pistols. That gives the advantage to us legal rifle holders. I’d much rather facedown a pistol wealding thug with a rifle than another pistol. You are right too about protecting the weak. I don’t ask that my SHTF group come armed to the teeth, what is better is if they bring skills and materials and rely on the DIY disasters that is me and my girlfriend when it comes to the weapons bit.

may Jesus go with you and the Gods and Goddess with me

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Vote -1 Vote +1DaveP326
April 17, 2012 at 7:45 am

I would have faith in Christ, but I would also have my .45 auto handy, too.

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Vote -1 Vote +1David Morris
April 17, 2012 at 10:34 am

Yes…remember, Jesus told his diciples to sell their extra clothes to buy a sword, Simon had a sword with him in the Garden, and when he used it to cut off the henchman’s ear, Jesus told him to put it away…not, “Why do you have that?” or “Get rid of that awful weapon!”

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jon
July 29, 2011 at 9:51 am

Another fire item to have in the car are flares. Besides their obvious uses, they burn for 10 to 15 minutes and can even ignite wet wood. And as fire starters, they don’t need matches.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Joe Hooker
July 31, 2011 at 8:54 am

The real reason I like your posts so much. Is because you are helping folks to carry the most important stuff of all. Because in ANY real life survival situation, it’s not what you carry on your back or in your hands that matters. It’s the knowledge you carry inside of your head that makes all the difference in the world!
So I really hope you keep up the good work!

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Vote -1 Vote +1Denise
July 31, 2011 at 9:01 am

My question is this: Where does a suburban single somewhat elderly lady bug out to? I do not have an emergency farm nor live anywhere near one. Thank you.

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+2 Vote -1 Vote +1Adina
September 2, 2011 at 3:25 pm

Like Ernest suggested, someone in your situation needs to do things a little differently. Otherwise you would be a prime target for predators in a serious collapse.
Our group is mostly seniors and specializes survival networks for disadvanted non affiliated single survivors.
Email me with what city you are in and maybe I can link you to like-minded resources.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Denise
July 31, 2011 at 9:03 am

My question is this: Where does a suburban single somewhat elderly lady bug out to? I do not have an emergency farm nor live anywhere near one. Thank you. Oh one other question regarding water If one lives near an ocean, is it worth investing in a desalinization device?

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Ernest
September 2, 2011 at 1:54 pm

The point of this web site is survive in place. I’m a middle aged man married and riddled with past injuries. We are not going to bug out. We have to prepare to make due where we are. We buy a little extra food, have a water filter system, and a dog for an alarm system. Survival is a mind set. I would suggest that you look for other women in the same boat and plan to prep with them. Desalinization devices are very expensive at least the ones I have found. If you have fuel you could distill the saltwater into fresh water but that would take a lot of fuel. Better to plan on catching rain water and try to find a river pond or stream the filter/treat and/or boil you water. The town that I live in has a group that share info and help to find partners to team up with.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Ray
September 27, 2011 at 10:53 am

Ernest, you are so right. If you run the nutrition required is 6000 calories a day. All the road issues. Survival in place is best and forming a group is even better. Unless you have a place to go, don’t. Most of my friends plan on going to my house if possible.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Danny
July 31, 2011 at 9:39 am

Does anyone know the best way for long term storage of kitchen matches

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+3 Vote -1 Vote +1Dave
July 31, 2011 at 4:53 pm

Kitchen matches can be dipped in melted wax (paraffin) to make them waterproof. Just scrape off the wax on the head and strike to light. The wax will help the matchstick to burn longer also, great help if you are trying to start a fire with wet tinder.

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+2 Vote -1 Vote +1Landel
September 5, 2011 at 1:37 am

Keep up the good work–God Bless all….
I used this back when I hunted the High Country–
Cheap, waterproof Fire starters / heat source–
Get some small wax coated ‘party cups’ Dixie? –Size optional–
Hardwood shavings, and Wax. (Gulf Canning Wax,or used candles)
Mix wood shavings in heated, molten wax, .
Once mixed, pour into the cups–within 1/2 inch of top. Allow to cool (solidify)
I cut four slits in the 1/2in. rim ,then fold it over the top of the wax. To use unfold,
and light the top. A clean,hot fire is the result. Can cook meals over it.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1blarman
September 6, 2011 at 4:12 pm

We used to make these in Cub/Boy Scouts and referred to them as “buddy burners.” They were made using rolled up cardboard put into tuna fish cans with melted wax poured over the top and a wick inserted for easy lighting. They last for hours with a constant, hot, almost smokeless flame. If you use one of those can openers that cuts into the side instead of the top, you can use that top to smother/put out the flame when you’re done as well as for storage.
We even cooked our own meal of hot dogs and biscuits on them simply by slipping a #10 can (a coffee can size metal can) over the burning can) for a hot, flat surface. Cheap and easy and they are inherently waterproof..

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jean
September 23, 2011 at 8:01 am

Making firestarters. You can use your dryer lint mixed with molten wax in paper egg carton. Once cool, tear the cells apart and store.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Wwillowa
October 31, 2011 at 10:15 am

another fire starter I just came up with is (and yes, I’ve tried it out), open a book of matches, drip wax from a candle or…on it until the wax soaks between the matches, etc, close the cover when still soft. To light, open the cover, light the matchbook stick under your tinder, or whatever. Carry in ziplock or something that will protect it.
I also, though I have not tried this yet, thought of using, especially in the wind, those birthday candles that re-light if they are blown out, to light a fire.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1LeAnne Bryant
August 22, 2011 at 7:38 pm

Boy Scouts can tell you. My suggestiotion is to use plastic film cannisters for the small ones or use something similar for the larger ones. I tend to double freezer bag some items for myself when traveling to prevent exposure–double up on the freezer bags.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Wwillowa
October 31, 2011 at 10:09 am

A box of kitchen matches (get only the ‘strike anywhere’ kind, by the way, It seems that the US is the only place in the world that make that kind, and they are getting a bit harder to find) just put in a ziplock will keep pretty well, but the best in my experience is to empty the box into a wide mouth glass pint canning jar. Keep out of the sunlight and they will kepp well. I did that and buried a jar of matches at an old camping spot in the mountains. Every year when I go up there, I dig up the jar and try a couple of matches, so far, 4 years now, they work fine, even though it freezes hard up there, etc, they are not subjected to sunlight.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Michael
December 30, 2011 at 6:10 pm

Check out the REI matches, they will continue to burn even if immersed in water and they work great to start fires. They are waterproof, and long burning

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Lucille
July 31, 2011 at 10:02 pm

The honey is an excellent product to keep on hand. Just make sure it is raw or not pasteurized which removes all the nutrition.
I no longer use bleach it’s too toxic, I’ve replaced it with H2O2 & white vinegar. Two different spray bottles. For sanitizing my cutting boards, counter tops, bathrooms etc. I buy the 35% strength and dilute it down to different strengths. It keeps well as long as it’s not exposed to daylight. I would use it before chlorine to sanitize my drinking water. It’s not the same as Peroxide it has additives and not consumable.
I have a problem hope someone can help me with. My husband of 57 years thinks this is nutty thinking. I’ve always been one to try and be prepared, preventive maintenance. He believes you don’t fix it if it’s not broke. Any ideas?

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Damon1
August 1, 2011 at 2:40 pm

Lucille, great advice on the H202, bleach is poisoning a lot of people and don’t even know it, its in our tap water, bath and showers (get filters). As for your husband, first of all just keep doing what your doing and if something does happen he’ll be greatful that you have prepared in advance. Second, your husband prepares ahead of time more than he knows, for example: does he put gas in his car/truck before it runs out? or does he let it run out of gas and then say “oh I sould’ve thought ahead” Does he add or change the oil before the engine burns up? Icould go on and on! Third, try getting him to go where someone who had everything they needed suddenly has nothing and needs help just to start over, such as a fire or flood or tornado etc. that picture will open his eyes to being prepared!

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+2 Vote -1 Vote +1Robert L. Spinner
August 24, 2011 at 3:29 pm

Preventive medicine is the key to keeping what you have in good shape for a much longer period of time. The cost of waiting is astronomical in comparison to yearly maintenance. Replacing the item early in the life because of lack of maintenance of the item is costly and not very good sense. Unless you have lots of money and hate to work on your items in question. Usually a lazy, rich person can say “if it’s not broke don’t fix it”. Because they will buy the next newer version and not sweat the cost. A practical person with average and low income would always use preventive medicine to protect and keep the item for the intended life or longer. Poor and lazy people just don’t care. Period. ( i believe you are in the middle, by the way. Good luck.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Share Smith
August 2, 2011 at 11:51 am

Good advice!
I do take exception to eating the Kibble for dogs, except in a life or death situation. Most of it contains formaldihyde! Look up dry dog food on the Net..causes health problems…same for cat food. The people who breed show dogs won’t use it. Just FYI!

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Vote -1 Vote +1Dean
September 5, 2011 at 4:33 am

It is no wonder I am a bit off. I ate dog biscuits for years when I got up before my folks. then I learned to cook…
Vinegar,peroxide, honey,but never forget olive oil! or WD 40

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1B K Roberts
August 12, 2011 at 9:18 pm

I am quite new to this site, so please excuse my ignorance if what I am about to say doesn’t make sense – chalk it up to lack of experience. I read a couple of folks suggesting dried dog food as an emergency food source, then different complaints why not. What about dried beans and lentils? Some beans are a source of both carbs and protein. No, they are not fun to eat dry, but seems to sure beat the heck out of pet food in an emergency. I have a bag of ‘mixed’ beans (great northern and pinto) which provides 22g carbs (including fiber) and 8g of protein per 1/4 cup dry serving. If you gave me a choice, I’d sure rather eat a 1/4 cup of dried beans than ANY pet food. And my 2 lb. bag has twenty-five 1/4 cup servings. That’s enough for a family of four to have three servings a day for two days. Is it heaven? No, but it sure beats starving. Is there something I am missing? (obviously, with water, they could be re-hydrated).

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+2 Vote -1 Vote +1Jean
September 23, 2011 at 8:05 am

Beans are a good idea. If you soak them in water, not only rehydrates them, but when they sprout they become ‘alive’ and the nutritional content exponentially increases!

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Vote -1 Vote +1tim
August 24, 2011 at 3:52 pm

lucille, you plan your menu so you dont shop every day, you buy life,car,home insurance so why not emergency insurance ? the government came out after 9/11 and told people to have at least 3 days of necessary provisions and shelter because it might take some time before they could get to you.

god forbid but if a true global emergency or national emergency hit, would you want to have to go out looking for stuff ? we had a 3 day power outage here in ohio. I powered our house with a small inverter and my truck battery. we lost nothing but others lost freezers,refridgerators,medical supplies etc. my dad was amazed. I only paid $80.00 for the thing.

as far as trusting in god, what if he is telling you to stock up ? joseph warned the israelites and egyptians that there would be 7 years of plenty and 7 years of drought. they listened and survived. my gut says stock up.

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Vote -1 Vote +1jaxdia1&only
August 27, 2011 at 11:11 am

As for dog food. I have ben working with dog for over thirty years. Flint river is suppose to be one of the tophuman grade dog foods you can feed your doglegally and the term is used lightly……. if it says human grade it is suppose to be edible and healthy tbe a nutrtious meal for a human of approximately 165 pounds. Now that said. If I had a choice between dog food and starving…… I would prefer to share chays food than go hungry. Wellness and dick van patten dog foods are also suppose to be human grade foods. Go online and check them out the could keep you fromstarving for few days if all else fails. But don’t eat the dog they can help you to get food. Also they are an early warning sign for entruders. :) jax

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Vote -1 Vote +1Mac
September 2, 2011 at 9:40 am

Medications should be in one area, not scattered from the kit to the bathroom…For the people on a controlled prescription plan…save the last pills (in your Rx bottle) you have left after filling your next prescription until you have at least 10 day supply( By saving the bottle, if you need refill the MD knows the name, dosage, and when you are to take them.) Then exchange them for new pills each New years and July 4th. In fact check and exchange everything, such a breakfast bars etc. I have a lg. Kitty litter bucket with supplies,
In answer to the question; What do you think is going to happen? What about train accidents with toxic fumes leaking, a plane, or large truck accident and the community must be evacuated. Happens all the time and you must evacuate immediately.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Cindy M
September 2, 2011 at 11:42 am

We have a “havaheart trap and my hubby owns a rifle, as added protection. In a pinch, we could trap squirrels, chipmunks for food which will feed us and my cat, Fred too. We’re located on ten acres of land in a very rural area- nearest neighbors are summer cabin people from Canada. The soil up our way is poor. We have a lot of pine trees- Pine needle tea is high in Vitamin C and tolerable with honey added. Berries and apple trees grow wild near us as well.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1T Hammer
September 3, 2011 at 10:11 am

I have found the comments interesting and would like to add two items: ammonia is very effective at neutralizing the itch in a variety of insect stings and bites–plain, not lemon scented–and heat is very effective at neutralizing neurotoxins from the sea (not a problem for most of you, but handy to know for snorkelers in Florida).

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Vote -1 Vote +1Glenn Finley
November 1, 2011 at 11:18 am

We learned at an early age that taking a leak on a jellyfish sting would remove almost the sting. And yes, I do mean pissing on someone, even a loved one, if they are stung. it works, whether from the heat or acid, I don’t know, but it works.

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Vote -1 Vote +1MarkL
September 3, 2011 at 6:38 pm

Just a quick note about the multimeter and battery testing: a digital multimeter will not create enough load on a battery to give an accurate reading – unless it is specifically designed for battery testing. Use an analog meter (dial & needle type). In some battery packages they put a test strip which would be very handy for the pack.

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Vote -1 Vote +1emmett
September 4, 2011 at 9:40 am

MarkL: My understanding is that the multimeter would be used to determine the voltage in batteries, which have a drop in voltage as they are being discharged. What is the purpose of putting a load on the battery other than to test a car battery to determine if it is need of replacement?

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Vote -1 Vote +1Mike L.
September 6, 2011 at 4:03 pm

Great suggestions! I really liked the whistle idea. If possible, maybe you can get whistles with different sounds for each member of your family to identify each other if separated, in the dark, etc.

Air guns can be used safely in a suburban location, and .22 caliber air rifles will kill small game out to 50 yards reliably. A rifle with a shrouded barrel is so quiet your neighbors won’t hear it. Unfortunately, good ones aren’t cheap. Bows are also quiet, and can be effective on almost anything. Don’t forget some type of fishing tackle if you are close to water. Simple has worked for thousands of years.

You can’t be expected to remember everything, so prepare with “paper memory” — books. An old standby is the Boy Scouts Handbook. It covers everything from first aid to shelter. Another of my favorites are the Foxfire book series which have a wealth of information about living without the conveniences we now consider essentail. Great reading.

Barter will probably be the norm, so what do you have to trade? It could be anything from gold to guns, medical skills, knowledge of herbal remedies, engine mechanics, etc. If you are smart enough to survive the inital chaos, by default you have something of value. Use it wisely.

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Vote -1 Vote +1samnjoeysgrama
April 13, 2012 at 3:14 pm

The quietest way to get game is a trap. I have a squirrel sized live trap. Just be sure you also have something long and sharp to dispatch the critter with so you don’t have to open the trap to remove it while it is still alive. Opening the trap in the garage while your hubby stands ready with a baseball bat would only be good for America’s funniest home videos.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jane
September 11, 2011 at 10:34 am

Someone mentioned beans. They make great sprouts, which are a highly
nutritious food, taste great, and don’t need to be cooked.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Rainbow
September 13, 2011 at 10:44 am

Amazing info!! Thank you so much……..I started my list a while back. I have almost all items suggested and will get the rest.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Trudy
September 22, 2011 at 1:43 pm

A good way to prepare for times of lack of food is fasting. Just do it for about 5 days a few times while you have the choice to do so. You learn to get comfortable without eating, and your body will be able to switch from food nourishing to nourishing through its own reserves (fasting) any time. You can easily fast for 30 days, and you will not get weak but strong. So carrying around food supplies for 3 days or eating dog food is not really necessary. You need to know that when eating raw food 800 calories are enough for a working adult, with processed and cooked food you need 2200 calories. When there is a shortage of food, don’t cook it. Store wheat, oats, carots (unwashed), almonds, nuts, apples, lentils, onions, garlic, cabbage, sauerkraut all of which can be eaten raw. You may want to soak the wheat, oats and lentils in water overnight so you can eat easier. And you can let those things grow for variety.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Terry Smith
September 25, 2011 at 10:08 am

Never thought about bailing wire before, good idea. Coffee filters too. Tip: for cheapskates like me who like to save money. I reuse coffee filters several times. I shake them out they dry out and scrape again and good to go.
Thanks again for your good information.

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Vote -1 Vote +1samnjoeysgrama
April 13, 2012 at 3:17 pm

Easier to find electric fence wire than baling wire anymore. Many of the small bales and almost all the large use twine now. Although a nice ball of twine would be good, too.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Miss Kitty
September 25, 2011 at 11:21 pm

Concerning eating pet food to survive: This isn’t a bad idea if you purchase truly high-quality pet food. Look for ones that do NOT contain “by-products” of ANY kind. “By-product” is a code word for “garbage.” Things like rotting roadkill, animals put down at the pound, cattle and other food animals so sick (“downers”) that it is illegal for a slaughterhouse to process them, get sent to “rendering plants” where they are ground up, cooked, and become “by-products.” Wonder why so many of our pets now get cancer and other chronic, “human” diseases? If you knew what goes into most pet food, you would not be surprised in the least. And many of the so-called “premium” lines of pet food are by-product based too, even therapeutic ones you buy from your vet! So read the labels VERY closely. That said, as someone else mentioned, best of all is to look for pet foods that state they are human-grade. The only line I know of FOR CERTAIN that uses only human-grade ingredients is called “Azmira.” They make both canned and kibble forms, for both cats and dogs. Cat food is more expensive than dog food, as a rule, and the reason is this: cats require much more protein in their diet to be healthy than dogs do. In a SHTF situation, you are going to want as high a protein diet as you can get, because protein gives you sustained energy that carbs do not. So I personally would recommend cat food as better survival nutrition than dog food. The other good thing about high-quality pet foods is that they are supplemented with essential vitamins and minerals. Personally, I love beans and lentils, but if that’s all you have to eat for awhile, you will develop vitamin and other nutrient deficiencies that will make you tired, sluggish, more susceptible to disease, and so on. A couple days or a week of beans and lentils — well, that’s OK. Beyond that, your health and strength and alertness could really start to get compromised. Which would be the last thing you would want in a crisis situation. So do I really love the idea of eating cat food? Nope, but I keep quite a lot extra on hand — first, to feed my cats in a crisis situation, and second, to feed myself if need be. And that brings me to one more point I wanted to make — make sure to have a bug-out bag for your animals as well as for yourself. That would include not only foods and possible medical needs, but leashes, ID tags, portable shelter, etc. The govt. *MIGHT* eventually show up with MREs to keep YOU from starving in a disaster, but the well being of Fido or Fluffy isn’t even going to be on their radar screens. Guaranteed.

Peace, and keep up the good work, all of you …

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Ray
September 27, 2011 at 10:57 am

Whistle, this is very important. Over water you can hear it 1000 yards, Navy Survival Training. I always have my kids carry one and carry a couple, beats shouting.

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+2 Vote -1 Vote +1Smitty D
September 29, 2011 at 10:20 am

I agree with all of you and what you have listed. The one thing I have stocked for emergency use and have not seen mentioned is white rice. Great source of protein and starch (carbs) that can be eaten raw to supply needed nutrition, but will also swell in the stomach and stop hunger pains. A Vietnam vet told me about this and said he had witnessed Vietcong on the move eating raw rice while moving. With a 2 to 1 cooking ratio with water, cooked rice will sustain for a long time.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Glenn Finley
November 1, 2011 at 11:22 am

Smitty, rice and beans cooked together are almost the perfect mix of protein and carbohydrates. All you need is a couple squirts of hot sauce for a fine, nutritious meal.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Nancy Robertshaw
September 29, 2011 at 4:21 pm

How much peroxide do you use to sanitize a quart of water?

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1grayworker
September 30, 2011 at 7:18 am

I’m not a real big drinker and I dont smoke, but I’m thinking of having a carton of cigarettes with some small bottles of whiskey? This seems like it would be an excellent barter item vs gold or cash etc for people wanting some in exchange for your more common sense needs. Not trying to get holier than thou, just to have some of what I think would be high demand items.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Gundog
October 12, 2011 at 9:14 am

My BOB is a large ammo box in my truck. It has good water proof seals and can hold a lot of supplies. It is very heavy so a backpack is needed if I have to abandon my truck. Although I would take my 9mm handguns in my truck a must for a long foot treck would be my 22 cal. target pistol. You can carry a lot of 22LR rounds and the gun fits well in a backpack and is a fine hunting piece for small game. Also a hatchet is advisable for cutting firewood and ground cover for sleeping. Matches can be kept dry in medicine/vitamin bottles with screw on caps.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Farmer Bill
November 1, 2011 at 2:44 pm

I live twenty miles from town, a mile from a major highway and a1000 ft driveway leads to the house. Rougher neighborhoods a few miles east \, west and north. I have guns, food , water generatorand a will to use them.. But I am seventy-four yrs. old and have slowed down a bit. I will not bug out. If need be and time permits I will block the drive way at 500 ft at the first ditch,tractor crossways and pick up next. Then a mean old DAV wdith achoice of wepons.. At my back will be my life (Wife) partner of 40+ years, and as friends in TX would say we will Git Er Done, shoot and scoop or die truing. God Blessed the USA as it was and should be again.. FB

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Vote -1 Vote +1Farmer Bill
November 1, 2011 at 2:56 pm

I”m, not urban I’m country off the main rd and a 10000 ft drive way I can’t bug out.. I have food and water., chickens a generator a ninty one yr old mom-in law wife and some rougher areas to my N E W andA forest to my south.I’m 74 and in fair health. wife 59. There is no place to run. FB

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Vote -1 Vote +1Rick Carta
March 21, 2012 at 11:04 pm

You may have nowhere to run, but you need to have an emergency plan nonetheless. Pay attention to what happened to the farmers in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) or the farmers in Argentina. Set up solar powered weatherproof cameras and alarms, build an underground shelter and escape tunnel. Collaborate with neighbors and watch out for each other with routine checks to see if each other is well. Be vigilante, well armed and get off the grid with solar and wind power.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Gale
November 2, 2011 at 8:01 am

I am new to this site and complement all on their preparedness foresight. I would like to also suggest reading “one second after” – can be found and puchased from Amazon. It is a fictional situation for the story but very real should the U.S. be hit by a “dirty bomb” or an EMP strike. It too is a good preparedness manual. As a child I was fortunate to be reared in a preparedness manner. I am 73 now and can remember my parents having us all practice survival drills in our shelter areas and the schools did the same. The WWII and the “cold war” were big issues – I have never forgotten that training. I was reared to always be prepared! Please go to Google and read up on EMP strikes – there is no warning.

Best to all.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Simone
November 2, 2011 at 2:40 pm

Please add me to your email list .Very informative and excellent website ! I AMA handicapped senior living in ***************Canada .Where do you suggest I order supplies ! Simone .

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Vote -1 Vote +1FloridaDave
November 3, 2011 at 2:44 pm

For personal use, we have a large supply of legumes and rice. We have stored lots of bar soap and TP for personal use and barter (I suspect that these basics would be worth their weight in precious metals if things get bad enough). We also have a good store of wheat berries (cracked, they make a palatable hot cereal, and barely sprouted are full of vitamins). For additional fresh greens, we have started stocking seeds for sprouting and storing them in the refrigerator (radish, broccoli, alfalfa). For long-term survival, we also have some seeds stored in the freezer for crops that grow fast and are edible–roots and tops (radish, turnip, beet). Nobody can survive long without water. We have stocked a well point with enough pipe and drive couplings to hand-drive a well in a matter of hours (I’ve done this before). We have the necessary check valve and pitcher pump stored also. Another source of emergency water involves using a solar still. Store some sheet plastic and a cheap siphon pump / tubing combo to draw out the collected water. How about some braided wire (fishing leader) for small animal snares? Luck favors those who are prepared!

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Vote -1 Vote +1Adam in England
December 31, 2011 at 8:33 am

When ever I have a little spare cash. I buy a role of barbed wire. I also go to demolition sites and ask if they wouldn’t mind if I take the barbed wire , as it is not much value for the demo crew considering the hassle of removing the nasty stuff. if the SHTF one day we would quickly string a load up the side gate to our house and all around the fence round the back garden (that’s a back yard to my american friends), to deter raiders and general theives. Some say tha this would make your property look like a good target , but having worked with theives and burglars as a prison officer for over 10 years and a magistrate for 2, I know that type of person always goes for the easiest target.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Caribou
February 25, 2012 at 6:04 pm

Soak your dry beans for 24 hours changing the water every 3 to 4 hours while you are awake. Most recipes say 12 hours but I find this eliminates almost all gas. Finish cooking them in mason jars in a pressure cooker. This canning process leaves a few extra meals on the shelf and uses less energy. A good book on canning and someone to walk you through it the first time will give you a great skill. If you have a heat source that works when the power goes out, much of the freezer contents can be preserved before it goes bad. You can jar up butter and almost anything else you find in cans or jars at the store. Mason jars can be found for reduced prices at garage sales and second hand places like Salvation Army or Good Will.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Patrick Bird
April 13, 2012 at 12:35 pm

Excellent. I have a few things in my bug out bags that I don’t need and have replaced them with TP, garbage bags and a whistle.
Thanks.

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Vote -1 Vote +1samnjoeysgrama
April 13, 2012 at 1:19 pm

Be aware that there are basically three types of survival food on the market: The big buckets of grain, soy meat crumbles, freeze dried veggies, etc which are great for a remote cabin. The #10 cans of pre-made meals which can take up to 20 minutes to cook, and The backpackers “just add hot water” envelopes to take in a BOB. If you are surviving in place or bugging out, you may not want to soak beans and cook them for a couple hours before you can eat. That is when you need the instant packets or envelopes of food. Cooking food smells lovely, especially if you are starving, so you can become a magnet for all those who didn’t prepare but can follow their noses. .
A friend of mine has been prepping for the last 10 years. He doesn’t even plan to plant a garden for two years after the SHTF. He says most of the gangs will have starved by then. Just a thought as you prepare and decide which food to store.

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Vote -1 Vote +1samnjoeysgrama
April 13, 2012 at 2:50 pm

BTW If you are outfitting a cabin or even a well protected house in town, go visit antique stores for some good ideas on “non-electric” tools. Saws, brace and bit (drill), clamps, etc. in antique stores are often still very functional. Also check out the stores where the Amish buy many of their things: http://www.lehmans.com/store/catalog?Args= Lots and lots of great “non-electric” items, as well as books on soap making, butchering, cheese making, etc. Fun web site regardless.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Robet Wassman
April 14, 2012 at 8:04 pm

Garlic is an antiseptic and can be used to treat wounds

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