Picking the Ideal Permanent Retreat Location

by David Morris on February 24, 2012

This week’s newsletter is going to be quite a bit different than normal…it’s going to primarily be a conversation among readers (and myself) and it’s an article that you’re going to want to come back to throughout the coming days to read and reply to the comments and responses.

One of the most common lines of questioning that I get from people is about the “best” place to move to. The intensity of this question has been increasing as of late, with friends calling me up, telling me that they’re ready to make big changes in their lives, and asking me where in the heck they should move to.

I’ve read every book that I know of on the topic, as well as countless forum postings, and the only constant answer to the question of where to live is, “It depends.” This question has as many answers as it has people asking the question, simply because of how different people’s lives are. You may need to be close to a major airport for business or to be able to get to ailing parents quickly. You may have medical concerns that mean you need to stay near a military hospital or another specific type of medical facility. You may have allergies or arthritis, lung issues, or other conditions that dictate where you live. If your profession is geographically specific, you’re going to be limited somewhat.

Wheat farmers and deep sea fishermen are examples of this. Wheat farmers won’t find many wheat farms in New England and deep sea fishermen won’t find too many boats in Kansas.

Regardless of what your criteria is, the National Association of Realtors says that 1 in 7 households move every year. The US Census Bureau says it’s as high as 1 in 5 households. Either way, it happens a lot. One of the ramifications of that statistic is that thousands of people reading this article will be moving in the next 12 months. Thousands more will move in the following 12 months. In other words, this is an important topic and your educated input could literally help thousands of people.

In addition to “normal” factors, like jobs and family, many of those thousands of people will be choosing their new state, city, neighborhood, and house based in part on how survivable it would be in the event of an EMP, currency collapse, infrastructure breakdown, terrorist attack like a suitcase nuke, hacking, or bio weapon attack. These events, and dozens more could all easily lead to a breakdown in supply chains and civil order.

The fact is, where you spend the majority of your time is going to be one of the biggest factors in creating a survival and preparedness plan. That’s the exact reason why I created the SurviveInPlace.com Survival and Preparedness Course…because most people spend the majority of their time in houses and cities that are a far stretch from being “perfect” and they need to have a practical plan in place when disaster strikes.

But what if something in your life changed today that made it possible to relocate to your ideal location—one where you’d be equally happy spending the rest of your life if no disaster ever struck or if civilization imploded in on itself tomorrow.

This week, I want to get a lot of input from you—particularly from those of you who have recently moved and from those of you who are in the process of picking a new place to call home.

If you are looking to relocate, what features are you looking for? If you have relocated, what features DID you look for? Regardless, if you could tap your toes and live anywhere you wanted to live, where would it be?

Would you want to follow the Mel Tappin model and look for a town of 10,000, hoping that it’s big enough to provide mutual aid and a wide range of skills but too small to support a large entitlement population?

Would you want to live in the middle of nowhere, cut off from society, hoping to be insulated from people?

Would you want to live in a tiny town, hoping to be accepted as a local?

Would you want to live in a city of a million or more, to take advantage of the increased earning potential, shopping choices, medical care, technology, and food choices for as long as possible?

Would you look for a city in the 100,000 range, so that you could have a taste of both big and small?

Do you want to live outside of one of these towns in an attempt to mix the benefits of rural living with the conveniences of urban shopping and job opportunities?

Do you think that the popularity of the upper Northwest among preppers makes it more desirable or simply makes it a concentrated target?

How about specific states and towns? Any “honey holes” where you love living now as a prepper or would love to move to? (Only if it makes sense to share them)

Kerrville TX? Mena AR, Angelfire NM? Montrose CO? Ft. Collins CO? Colorado Springs CO? Basalt CO? Prescot AZ? Carson City NV? Salt Lake City UT? Ogden UT? Sun Valley ID? Coeur d’Alene ID? Sandpoint ID? Spokane WA? Bend OR? Fairbanks AK? How about East of the Mississippi in the Appalachians? Or even other countries like Chile, Panama, or the Philippines?

In short, if you could pick your ideal place to live, where would it be and why do you want to go there?

Is there an established prepper network to plug in to? Is that where your family and friends are? Is it purely a SHTF tactical decision?

Do you want to move somewhere and drop out of society, or move somewhere where in the hopes of having your cake and eat it too…enjoying the benefits of both increased self-reliance and a developed infrastructure and a wide variety of foods, products, and services during good times.

Do you want to live in a “prepper” community?

What about factors like politics, gun laws, homeschooling laws, taxes, local views on alternative medicines, predominance of a “buy local” mentality, crime rates, great churches, etc.?

Share your experiences, questions, and thoughts by commenting below…this promises to be a fun and informative discussion.

God Bless & Stay Safe,
David Morris

SurviveInPlace.com

 

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{ 39 comments… read them below or add one }

Vote -1 Vote +1Robert
March 3, 2012 at 11:31 pm

Would like to meet like minded Preppers living in or near Spring Texas. Would enjoy meeting in person and further discussing surviving in place. There is strength and security in numbers. Look forward to hearing from you.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Norman
March 4, 2012 at 9:28 am

I live and work in the Houston area and am new to prepping. Would like to talk to you more about getting prepared.

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Vote -1 Vote +1barry
March 9, 2012 at 4:50 pm

Howdy,
I live near you, Robert, and know that anywhere near Houston will be very dangerous & untenable.
Those of us unable to move will need to band together locally and watch our neighbor hoods very carefully, then learn how to cooperate to share resources and teach one another. A remote retreat would be nice IF it can be effectively guarded, but it may be impossible to get past fuel shortages, roadblocks & gangs once things fall apart.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Brian
March 4, 2012 at 8:44 am

Great topic as are all!
We currently live in Orange County, CA and would like to connect with like minded in the area. Our current plan is to be out of CA and in North Texas in about a year and a half.

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Vote -1 Vote +1cj
March 4, 2012 at 6:46 pm

I will go ahead and put in my 2 cents. I live in SE Wyoming. I moved here from TX in 2005. Neither state has state income taxes, but TX property taxes are ridiculous. TX has a much longer growing season, but very hot in the summer. Wyoming is very windy a lot of the time, especially in winter. It is nothing to have days of 40-60mph winds. Wyoming is gun friendly, with permitless carry, either open or concealed. You can pretty much walk into a gun store and buy what you want as long as you are not a felon! No wait. Homeschooling is easy, just copy the scope and sequence or the book contents for the superintendent and they will approve or disapprove of your curriculum. I have never been disapproved. They also have virtual Wyoming, which is a public school online. Taxes are pretty low. We have big government socialists in our state legislature, like everyone else, but we have some legislators with brains too. Crime rates are low in my area, but I don’t know about the rest of WY. I would guess the whole state pretty low as everyone has at least one gun! There are lots of churches to chose from in this area. I have some prepper friends that I met through the Tea Party. We have some really good people here, and some real jerks, just like everywhere. I wish there wasn’t so much wind and the growing season was longer. Like one guy told me, the wind may be lousy, but it keeps the Kalifornians out! It also keeps our air really clean. You can extend the growing season with a greenhouse too.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Angel
March 4, 2012 at 9:22 pm

I live in Mansfield,TX. Just moved here from lower Alabama. New to prepping but loving this course. I am feeling more empowered every week! Do any peppers live near me? I agree with the strength in numbers! Look forward to hearing from you!

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1rich
March 5, 2012 at 8:09 am

Great topic. My wife & I live in The Democratic People’s Republic of Brooklyn, so we’re mostly looking at survive in place-type preparations. Trying to get out of here would be impossible in almost any scenario where systems have failed. Too many unprepared people. Too many bottlenecks getting in & out. I would have 2 hops through bridge/tunnels just to get to the mainland. We would like to have a place to get to if we knew far enough ahead to split, or after waiting a couple weeks if/when travel would be less dangerous. (When enough people have left, grid-lock gone, maybe systems recovered somewhat, but before dangerous groups get strong.) Where would people recommend we look for a small piece of land for a BOL in this area? Anyone know of an area upstate NY, close enough we could get there in reasonable amount of time, but out of the way enough that it won’t be overrun with refugees? Anyone in NY area know of good prepping groups? I know there is a guy doing some meetups here but I haven’t been able to join any yet. thanks.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Evelyn
March 6, 2012 at 4:23 am

I live in the Houston area but found a place while visiting my dad in West Texas. It is 421 miles from here. Perfect place with city water/sewer but also has a water well and a storm cellar that was retrofitted as a bomb shelter in the 60’s–with a toilet!! Very cheap, too. It would be my disaster plan however in the event of an EMP/nuclear blast (remember we have the refineries)–how would I get there? The cars would not run. The gas stations would not pump. Any suggestions?

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Vote -1 Vote +1Stacey
June 26, 2012 at 4:42 pm

Evelyn,
Get an old vehicle that does not run on “computer” system like our new ones. The EMP shouldn’t shut those down.
Good luck!

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1StuckOnaRock
March 6, 2012 at 4:35 am

I live in Hawaii….a rock….in the middle of the big blue pacific ocean….super. I was born and raised here. There is no ‘getting out of dodge’ when theres nowhere to go….quite literally. you need a plane or a ship and good luck getting one if the SHTF. so i plan to stay put and do what i can to ensure the survival of my family(me, husband and 3 little ones) and any other relatives i can help. my family has a small one acre parcel in a rural(as rural as your gonna get here) part of the island. its measly but you have to start somewhere and something is better than nothing. luckily our town is small enough that everyone knows someone who knows your mama, but big enough that walmart is completely emptied of its stock when ever a ‘disaster’ (hurricane, tsunami, etc.) is impending. we’ll be building a cabin on it soon. nothing fancy or big but completely off grid and im itching to start my garden and get our animals going. we plan to have chickens, pigs, goats…if im lucky a cow or 2. wish there were space for horses. between my husband and i we have quite a bit of handy skills. he does masonry for a living and we both grew up in carpentry families…we’ll be building our home entirely on our own. i grew up around ranching also so i’m familiar with animals….and i’m no stranger to hard work. i sew, i’m a cna, i can shoot a gun and a bow and i’m good with a knife. hubby’s brainy and crafty we both have many skills and we work well together. I say i was born in the wrong era because i would much rather live the way pioneers did. We’re gonna make what we got work because there is no other choice….if you think its hard or expensive to move around the continental U.S. try putting an ocean between you and your destination. I’d rather be in Alaska. So i say, life isnt ideal, you have to make it that way. Knowledge truly is power, if you werent brought up with many skills, LEARN. and learn NOW. theres always something to learn, I’m only 25, I know alot but I dont know everything so I keep learning, keep adapting, keep working to make my life as ideal as possible. I’ve always been preparedness minded and have never had to run to walmart or the grocery store to get my supplies when the news announces its time to do so….i’ve already got it.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Adam
March 6, 2012 at 4:24 pm

Can I hear from british preppers , specifically Southern English preppers as we can’t all relocate to the Highlands of Scotland or the Welsh hills and valleys.Come up Brits , share your ideas

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Vote -1 Vote +1Linda
March 6, 2012 at 9:32 pm

My choice if I had the money to move, I would move to Ecuador or Texas. I live in California in the L.A. County.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Mariowen
March 9, 2012 at 7:51 am

Move to Texas. We would love to have you!

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Vote -1 Vote +1barry
March 9, 2012 at 4:54 pm

I am in Texas, but eventually La Reconquista will overtake us gringos here, especially in the south and major cities. Immigrants will loot at the drop of a hat and take what you have to feed their broods without a second thought. They already do and our jails are bursting at the seams here. This is no place to settle for the long term.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Gene Terenzio Sr.
March 7, 2012 at 8:34 am

FYI, I heard Ron Paul on the radio say, on $2.50 gas as Ginrch says he can do if hes presadend, Said I can make gas cost 10 cents a gal., If we use the silver dime that we had before the govnerment, took aqll the silver out of our hands, Becaust that silver dime is worth $3.and change, It made me think, Wow I rember pumping gas when i was 16, for 23 cents a gal. And he is right we been getting screwd fo the last 50 years!

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Gene Terenzio Sr.
March 7, 2012 at 8:35 am

President

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1KJQ
March 7, 2012 at 9:47 am

I think the first thing you need to decide before looking at “where” is how bad you believe things could get (and for how long), and/or what level of preparedness you’re willing and able to undertake. I define three general levels of preparedness. Level one is basic, which involves enough means to survive for a few days to a few months (e.g. BOBs, food/water storage at home). Level two is having the means to survive for several months to a few years (e.g. able to grow/get food, water, shelter). Level three is the ability to survive indefinitely (e.g. farm in a prepper community) due to a TEOTWAWKI type event. Needing the first level of preparedness is the most likely, and the easiest to do. It is affordable for almost everyone, and usually doesn’t require one to relocate. Level two events are less likely than level one events and more likely than level three much more difficult to prepare for. It requires either living on or having ready access to some sort of farm like property. Level three preparedness is the least likely and the most involved. To do it right means having an extended prepper community/network as the assumption is there won’t be a government of any sort for some time to come, and/or your group would essentially need to start one like the puritans did. One needs to think of defense for all three levels, and it gets harder with each level as the number and/or desperation of raiders will increase. A big question for level two especially, and possibly three is – can you trust ‘the government’? This is problematic everywhere unless you plan to get a group and buy an unoccupied tropical island somewhere (not a bad idea). The idea here is that the better prepared you are, the more likely ‘the state’ will want to take what you have to ensure ‘fair distribution’. I live in Canada and right now I’m level one prepared. I have only a rudimentary level two plan involving some seed banking/farming training but would have to relocate with some friends to empty but fertile property. Winter would probably kill us, though. For level three I’m convinced I’d have to leave Canada. That would mean southern USA or more likely South America. Frankly, I don’t trust the US Gov’t any more than my own. Hopefully a country that was better off in general (e.g. Chile with its primary focus on agriculture and a net exporter). That will take much more planning and money which I don’t have at present, nor am I yet willing to make that radical a change in lifestyle (yet).

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Vote -1 Vote +1John Panagos
March 7, 2012 at 1:33 pm

Just gettig caught up on my emails, I live just outside of Jacksonville, FL.and due to a son who has parkinsons disease I have to plan on staying where I am. Most if not all my neighbors and familt think I’m paranoid and are not doing anything to prepare for any kind of problem, the only answere I get is there going to come to my house for what they need if trouble arises. I can help alittle but not for a long period of time and forget about the ones who think they will take what they want, 9 not going to happen), so I am having to go it alone with my wife and son so far and can only hope those wgo are not prepared so far do so soon while they stiil can.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Stacey
June 26, 2012 at 4:30 pm

John,
So these people live in Florida but don’t see the need to be prepared for disasters? They’ve never seen a hurricane?
If I were you I would do some VERY serious damage control here…i.e. tell those those moochers that they have convinced you that you are just being paranoid, you have other things to do with your money, are tired of storing the stuff, etc, etc. Whatever works!
Set up some very secure & hidden storage. Offsite caches or burying things would be a good idea. You can be sure that these idiots will do exactly what they say – or worse – if SHTF. Are you prepared to then defend the supplies that may mean life or death for your loved ones? Think about it.
And for heavens’ sake, STOP letting people know what you are doing!!

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Vote -1 Vote +1Emily
March 7, 2012 at 11:19 pm

Central Idaho along the Salmon river is attracting a lot of people. It is one of the places on the part of the map that remains in The Big Flood maps. Property prices are low, people have and use firearms, there are remote properties in the mountains. Growing season is okay. Part of it is high desert. Don’t expect any work ethic or education from the natives: they are entitled – high percentage of disability and welfare check folks … all white. They have a ‘live off the land’ thing and you, the newbie, are ‘the land.’ It appeals to men: Women hate it as a rule. Education is beyond pitiful. You can live private and mind your own business in most of rural Idaho. The land is gorgeous, and spring and summer are the best places in the world to be. Water rights are vital. You WILL be ‘home-towned by the inbreds in rural areas, this one included.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Martin
March 11, 2012 at 3:41 pm

We have property in Western/Central Idaho. The people are wonderful, and water rights are a given. If you want to drill a well and have plan on 1/2 acre garden, no water rights necessary. We have a year round spring on our property, and if we want to use it, we do need to get a water share. We are about 2 miles from a small town, but everybody we have met are anything but clanish. We are heading up there as soon as we can sell our current home in Central Utah.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Norma Archbold
March 8, 2012 at 10:27 am

Sounds like you are acting wisely. I would be surprised if Jacksonville, FL or where I live would be a major target for a surprise attack.

With my brother and sister’s families, I am a part owner of a small rural farmhouse. I live on an hour outside of a large metropolitan area. I’m far from what I would expect to be potential targets, and in less than a day (without going near potential attack sites) I could drive to our rural farmhouse, which is even more remote. I’m not making major preparations or stockpiling large amounts of food as I don’t see signs of an imminent emergency. (I do have a small stock of dry beans and spaghetti. Things like dry beans and spaghetti can be stored indefinitely and cooked anywhere there is water and heat to cook them.) Should the situation become dangerous, I would want more dry beans, spaghetti, canned goods and other food that can be stored indefinitely. These things would disappear quickly from stores in an emergency, so it might be a good idea for me to consider storing a supply that would last at least through a winter.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Martin
March 11, 2012 at 3:52 pm

Just remember, canned goods don’t last long, especially acidic foods (anything with tomato, eats right thru the can). And most canned foods cans are lined with BPA, a cancer causing plastic. Some of the newer can products (like Eden Organic) are BPA free. Plan on BPA free for a healthier life. In survival situations, health is so important.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Jerry
March 8, 2012 at 4:46 pm

I live in Houston. My 88 year old father in law and our 5 dogs have made it necessary to prep to hunker down.
We have several very good tactical defense schools in our area. I suggest to anyone, buy guns (multiple), get trained and stock up on ammunition.
I too would like to meet Houston preppers, but I’m not sure I know how to go about doing it.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Kat
March 10, 2012 at 11:47 pm

Looking for preppers in the Belleville Il area to compare ideas with. Thank you, Kat.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Harvey
March 11, 2012 at 5:01 pm

We live in a relatively small community in SouthWest Florida, but if shtf I do not think our area is defensible.Used to live in Northern Maine. 120 Miles North of Bangor. Except for the long long cold winters, this may be a good area. Potato farms are relatively cheap to buy, lots of wood, game, fish, and everyone is armed. Another area might be Wyoming, but I know the backroads of Maine, and have no experience with Wyoming.

Eastern Oregon may also be an option, but when I was there, it seemed that too many liberals were running that state.

In any case, now is the time to stock up on weapons and ammo. If Obama gets re-elected, you can kiss this Republic and our second amendment goodbye! We need to use the electoral process to keep America free. Violence is not a viable answer.

As a freedom loving Vietnam Vet. I will work my butt off to keep America FREE!!

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Vote -1 Vote +1Greg Thompson
March 16, 2012 at 9:04 am

How can you find prepper networks either where you currently live or in areas where you are considering moving to?

Thanks
Greg

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Vote -1 Vote +1Nancy Fritch
March 16, 2012 at 12:20 pm

Yes, Greg, I too would like to know how to find like-minded preppers. When I ask questions here in my area, the people believe these things will never happen. Very frustrating. Nancy

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Vote -1 Vote +1Fay Uyechi
March 16, 2012 at 1:41 pm

Any preppers in the Orlando area?? I’m about 20miles away…and while cars are still running, could get just about anywhere within reason! I’m the 75 year old Grandma that posted previously, but am serious about these endeavors.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Barbara D'harlingue
March 17, 2012 at 11:11 am

I live in Phoenix…have level one prepared but not much else…I will be moving to the Prescott Az area as it is the place that seems the best…..are there any others there I can contact.?
Barbara

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Vote -1 Vote +1Ruth
April 14, 2012 at 3:23 pm

Barbara, you are smart to get out of here…we have the largest nuke plant in the nation right here!! Prescott is nice and more rural…anywhere North is AZ seems good. I am in Mesa. Good luck, Ruth

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Vote -1 Vote +1Judith
March 23, 2012 at 5:52 am

Moved from WA State to Uruguay. Am putting up a website about establishing residency, esp. in Uruguay.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Emilie
March 25, 2012 at 7:42 am

Live in the Ft. Hood area with the understanding that travel will probably NOT be much of an option unless it’s on foot, so little by little stocking my home. Have a few neighbors who plan, but still think they’ll be able to get to a different location, which will leave me alone with my teen age son. Would like to find folks REALLY close to work with.

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Vote -1 Vote +1J W Mason
April 1, 2012 at 6:56 pm

Interested in meeting other preppers in the North Texas or Southern Oklahoma area–Denison/Sherman esp. Good mechanically and with guns.

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Eric Jones
April 6, 2012 at 10:35 am

I’m in Utah along the Wasatch Front and I enjoy it here. As far as selecting the perfect place, I don’t think there is one. As my Geography teacher would say, ‘You can die in a hurricane in Florida, in California you’ll die of an Earthquake, or in Kansas you’ll die of boredom!’ Just kidding to the Kansas people– you do have Tornados. Anyways, there are so many different disasters that that we are facing that at least one will touch wherever you live. That being said, I believe that you would need to leave any large city and surrounding areas within 72 hours of any regional disaster or collapse. I like Utah’s gun laws and gun culture, much of it is rural, many people are prepared and preparing (still wish it were more, of course), we have states to each side to provide a buffer from invasion, the rocky mountains to retreat into if needed, and I like the people as well. Not perfect (water being a problem in many areas), but I like it.

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Vote -1 Vote +1Patriot
April 12, 2012 at 6:20 pm

My husband is a Realtor in the mountains west of Denver. As some have previously mentioned, Park County is a great spot to relocate or bug out to as it is large and sparsely populated (South Park is here, lol). Also, as mentioned, water is a concern, so my suggestion is to ensure there is a well on the property and then have a backup (solar, generator, etc) system for the pump to run off in case there is no electricity. Rivers, creeks and lakes are relatively scarce so a backup to power the pump is essential, a spare pump would be helpful too and the expertise to install it ;). We have a few options of bug out locations, each further and further into the mountains to friends’ homes and lastly wilderness areas. I’m not sure what exactly would drive me into the wilderness, but it is an option! Our main plan is to stay in place though, God willing, but slowly we are piecing together a bug OUT plan if necessary. My daughter is giving us our first grand baby very soon. We will likely firm up plans to gather together at a defined location better suited for several families to hunker down than in our small place. May God truly bless you all in your preparations…

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Vote -1 Vote +1Ruth
April 14, 2012 at 3:17 pm

I moved all my life until I moved here and that was 37 years ago….time has passed really fast too. I grew up an Air Force ‘brat’ so have patriotism in my blood. It made for a life growing up that gave me strength, honor, backbone, and got to see lots of country. I would prefer to get out of this large city I live in, as we have the largest nuke plant in the US right here in our city proper and I would be within the hundred mile circle if it were to blow! In smaller towns people care about each other more and I would like if I could to be in an area that there were others who are patriots, have good sense about things and people of faith! That when push came to shove we would know what to do, stick together and stand for our nation and what we believe in. Maybe I am a dreamer to hope for such a place, but if all things were right that is what I would want. Coming together to help one another gives a sense of accomplishing even if it is only raising food and working to keep everyone going while waiting or planning what to do next. Safety and power in numbers, as long as there are people who agree to things the same way. It has all gotten to a point where it is going to come to a head one of these days and if we are not ready collectivly we are going to be either scattered or killed without a chance to prepare a place! It is one thing to have things to help in case of emergency, but it is a horse of another color to have to hold up for months or whatever alone without help and no where else to go but stay in place! While I am not afraid of guns or being strong and have the military spirit; I do not have some strong man around to help do the harder things or help…many of us gals are in that boat and some have children to care for or live with us!!

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+1 Vote -1 Vote +1Ruth
April 14, 2012 at 3:33 pm

PS: After posting and then reading many of the others comments it strikes me that it would be good to have a place in mind to head to for many of like minded people who could pool resources and work together to make a strong hold of sorts…maybe too much tv and movies but too many people floundering around each alone or in cities is not a safe place to be……also it is a must to be able to communicate with other folks of like mind and plan so as to have options as to where and what to do…..to me knowing there are others and to be able to get in touch and stay in touch would be of so much help….communication and whom to trust would be major at such a time! No matter how prepared of not we are, it is only the sum total of who we are that will make the difference. We don’t know how things would play out, who will do what to whom and how or when it all would come about- so we have to have an action plan or call chain to warn, inform or get in touch with other preppers, patriots, real down to earth American people in a safe way!!! Trust, security, safety and true plans are issues we would all be wondering about in such a situation or emergency!!

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Vote -1 Vote +1Lynn
June 27, 2012 at 8:59 pm

I am near Council Bluffs, Iowa (also Omaha Nebraska.) The western half of Iowa is
staunchly Republican, and as I talk to people, strongly patriotic. Great farm country.
I need to move further into the country, away from Omaha.
Re communication, I am looking into buying a ham radio system (or two; one for storage in
a Faraday cage) and last week I meet a guy who is talking about setting up a class if how to run the ham radio system and get licensed. Such classes might be a great place to meet like-minded people; ditto for the 912 groups/ tea party groups.

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